ADHD: Real Diagnosis or Provocative Sales Pitch?

It's been more than 50 years since Dr. Keith Conners first started hiscampaign to convince other doctors and parents that the 'bad seed' kidmay actually suffer a neurological disorder. His message was heard andnow he regrets it.

Experience of Acupuncture Eases Cancer Drugs’ Side Effects

The results of a recent clinical trial may offer the hope of relief from the distresses of cancer drugs by the experience of acupuncture.

Animal Study Shows Reproductive Problems After Antibiotic Treatment

In many cases, animal studies are completed before human studies are funded. In this case, an animal study on the antibiotic tetracycline provides enough base information on possible fertility problems to support further study in the human population.

Dad’s Folic Acid Consumption May Be Vital To Baby’s Health

Gentlemen, please eat your greens. And cereal, fruits, and veggies. Your children's lives may depend on it.

Human Breast Milk May Hold the Key to Curing Antibiotic Resistance

Antibiotic resistance is only increasing, but researchers believe theyhave found the key to brining antibiotic-resistant strains back undercontrol ' HAMLET.

Eat Mediterranean for Lifetime of Robust Health

If the Mediterranean diet brings such robust vitality to middle-aged women past their childbearing years, imagine what it can do for young women and the children they bear.

Expecting Quality Sleep: Healthy Diet Regulates Body’s Sleep and Wake Cycle

The interesting findings of a recent study suggests that everyone - pregnant or not - may enjoy better quality sleep if we pay closer attention to counting calories rather than counting sheep.

Drug Abuse Causes Long-Term Impairment of Sexual Performance

Drug abuse can have direct, immediate and devastating effects of sexual performance and fertility. Men who seek rehabilitation to stop drug abuse may be surprised to find out that sexual performance may be lacking even after they stop taking drugs.

Privately Insured Americans Experiencing Rise in Diabetes Diagnosis

Approximately 8.8 percent of insured Americans had diabetes or had a doctor tell them they were at risk for the disease in 2012 according to a new report by HCCI

Fruit Fly Study Reveals Possible Key to Autism

Some of the classic characteristics of the autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) describe a state of sensory overload - colors are too bright, light too intense, sounds too vivid, touch too acute, and odors that overwhelm.

Father's Diabetes May Cause Low Birth Weight

  Babies with a low birth weight are likely to have a father with late-onset diabetes, according to new research. Published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, this is one of the first studies to use information from the large, long-term study, UK Biobank. 

Personal Care Products Put Babies at Risk for Exposure to Parabens and Phthalates

Shampoos, lotions, and other baby care products expose babies and toddlers to potentially harmful substances at a great rate, according to a new study.

Erectile Dysfunction Drug Relieves Menstrual Cramps

A drug used to treat erectile dysfunction (ED) relieves menstrual cramps, according to a new study published in the medical journal Human Reproduction, without causing side effects.

Scientists Develop New Method to Understand Chlamydia

Scientists have developed a new way to track the activity of a microbe and the response of its intended host cell.

Oxytocin May Improve Social Functioning of Children with Autism

A single dose of oxytocin enhances brain activity while children with autism engage in social information, according to results of a recent study performed by researchers from Yale University.

1 in 6 Kids Suffers Neurodevelopmental Disorder, Environment to Blame?

One in six American children suffers from a neurodevelopmental disorder, including but not limited to, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorders ASD), or delays in speech and language.

17 Weeks Breast Milk, No Solids, Slashes Baby’s Food Allergy Risk

Seventeen seems to be the magic number to best protect a baby against the development of food allergies. A recent British study found that babies who are fed only breast milk until at least 17 weeks old are less likely to develop food allergies by age 2.

FDA Says Stop Selling 23andMe DNA Tests

More than half a million customers have had their blood tested but the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says enough already. The federal agency governing medical devices has recently issued a warning letter to the product's manufacturer.

Cialis May Help Men Orgasm and Ejaculate

Cialis, one of the more popular erectile dysfunction drugs, may help men achieve orgasm and ejaculation, according to a new study published in the British Journal of Urology International.

Newborns Aware of Their Own Existence on Day Two

One question many parents ponder is when does this glorious littleperson know it is indeed a separate and unique human being. When doesthe sense of self come into a baby's existence?

Using Oral Contraceptives For Many Years Increase Risk for Glaucoma

Women who take contraceptives for a long time may be at greater risk for eye problems, according to new research results presented at the 17th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology in New Orleans.

Too Much Sports May be Bad for Adolescent Well-Being

Health professionals are promoting exercise to help curb rising childhood obesity rates but results from a new study show that getting too much exercise might actually be bad for a child's health.

PTSD Symptoms Increase Risk for Obesity in Women

Women who suffer symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorde (PTSD) are at higher risk for becoming obese, according to a new study published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry. This research was the first to show that the symptoms of PTSD can contribute to obesity.

Vaccine Reduces Risk for Rotavirus-Related Seizures in Children

Rotavirus infection, the most common cause of diarrhea in infants and young children, can also cause seizures in some children. One Canadian study suggests 7 percent of children hospitalized with rotavirus had experienced seizures.

Bill Gates Foundation Grants Winner for Development of Next Generation Condoms

Each year, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation runs contests, or 'challenges,' for endeavors pursuant to its mission. This year, one GCE contest involved developing a new type of male contraception.

Children are Less Physically Fit than their Parents

Children are about 15 percent less aerobically fit than their parentswere at the same age, according to a new study presented by the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2013 in Dallas, Texas.

Promiscuous Moms May Produce Sexier Sons, In Mice

A promiscuous mother may produce sons that are more appealing to female mice, according to a new study. Female mice are attracted to pheromones present in the urine of male mice.

IVF and the Marital Challenge

In vitro fertilization (IVF) and other forms of assisted reproduction therapies (ART) rely on substantial doses of mood-affecting hormones, which add higher peaks and deeper valleys to one's everyday emotional roller-coaster.

Newborns May Get Sick So Beneficial Microbes Can Flourish

Within the first few months of a baby's life, many parents come to the realization that their new little bundle of joy is sometimes more bundle, less joy. This realization often occurs during long sleepless nights while trying to soothe a fussy or sick baby.

8 Public Places to Avoid During Cold and Flu Season

The best way to treat a cold or the flu is not to get them in the first place. Prevention means knowing where these nasty germs are hiding and avoiding them like the plague.

Cinnamon May be Effective Treatment for Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

Adding cinnamon to the diet may be an effective treatment for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

Experts Clarify Details Regarding PCOS Diagnosis

Scientists have now issued guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). There had been much debate in the medical community over various aspects of the condition.

Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Brain Tumors

Researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital across various hospital departments recently published the results of an 11-year study on the treatment of pediatric brain tumors with proton radiotherapy (PRT).

Neuropsychological Functions and Quality of Life in Intracranial Germ Cell Tumor Survivors

The chances of a pediatric patient surviving an intracranial germ cell tumor are high, leading researchers from Taiwan to question the effect of long-term survival on neuropsychological function and overall quality of life.

Childhood Anemia at High Altitude

According to researchers and authors from Harvard Medical School, children at high altitude are at increased risk of severe disease and anemia than children raised at lower altitudes. The study was published in the October 7, 2013 edition of Pediatrics online.

Cause of Pain in Women with Endometriosis

Researchers know little about how pelvis pain is caused in women with endometriosis. In a recent study published in the Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, researchers suggest neural growth factors may play a part in the development of endometrial pain.

Gel Application to Reduce Pain During PAP Smear

Insertion of the speculum during a PAP smear examination can be painful for some women. The fear of this pain may be enough to keep women from scheduling an annual examination.

Role of Socioeconomic Status on Maternal Depression

Quality of life, for pregnant women and new mothers, can be affected by depression. Research also points to negative side effects on newborn growth and development when depression is an issue for new mothers.

Breast Milk Sold on Internet May be Tainted

Breast milk purchased over the internet could make babies sick, according to a new study. Researchers found high amounts of bacteria in most of the samples they purchased through two internet companies.

Cancer Treatment in the Premenopausal Woman and Accelerating Ovarian Age

Researchers believe keystone research into ovarian reserve markers is crucial to the future of reproductive medicine. Thousands of women undergo cancer treatments each year, some of which affects fertility by destroying follicles that play a crucial part in egg maturation and overall fertility.

Abdominopelvic Tuberculosis Mimics AOC and PID

Doctors and researchers in the Jiangsu Province in China note 28 cases of Abdominopelvic Tuberculosis (TB) commonly misdiagnosed as advanced ovarian cancer (AOC) or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID).

Apnea in Children Hospitalized With Bronchiolitis

Researchers from the Department of Pediatrics at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center in California recently published a study that aimed to find common characteristics that increased the risk of apnea in children admitted to the hospital with bronchiolitis.

Contraception and Fertility Awareness Among Solid Organ Transplant Women

According to researchers in Nebraska and New York, female transplant patients are not adequately informed about fertility issues, contraception and chance of pregnancy after solid organ transplant.

A Bone Hormone May Influence Brain Development and Cognition

Researchers discovered that the skeleton exerts a powerful influence on brain development and cognitive function in unborn mice. Findings in mice studies could eventually lead to new approaches to the prevention and treatment of certain neurological disorders in humans.

New Warnings About Bed Sharing with Infants

The number of babies who share a parents' bed has more than doubledsince the early 1990s, according to the recent National Infant SleepStudy, despite a number of public service ads warning of the increasedrisk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

University Students Altering Birth Control Schedules to Alter Menstruation

  Hormonal birth control pills can be used to delay or eliminate some menstrual periods, especially for women who experience heavy bleeding or prolonged menstrual periods, but according to researchers university students are altering birth control schedules .

Intelligence May be Linked to Length of Time Spent Breastfeeding

Researchers from Boston Children's Hospital believe cognitive development, or intelligence, may be associated with the length of time an infant spends breastfeeding.

Erection Problems Early Sign for Heart Disease or Death

A new Australian study published in PLoS Medicine claims even the slightest case of erectile dysfunction could be caused by an underlying heart condition that could increase risk of early death.

Are BRCA 1/2 Mutations Associated with Early Onset Menopause?

Researchers from the Department of Obstetrics at UC San Francisco recently published a study testing a possible connection between BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations and early onset menopause.

Safety of Indomethacin IUD: Random Control Study

Researchers from the China-Japan Friendship Hospital report indomethacin IUD are effective and carry a low risk of complications, including expulsion, bleeding and pain.

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