Women's Health News and Studies

Family Pet Boosts Autistic Child’s Social Skills

A research scientist at the University of Missouri refers to pets as “social lubricants,” so effective that even autistic children develop improved social skills when there’s a pet in the family. ... read more »

Stillbirth 10% Higher for Boy Babies

A recently published study from the United Kingdom finds that the global rate of stillbirth is 10% higher for boy babies than for girls. ... read more »

Science and Female Erogenous Zones

A team of scientists published the findings of a study they conducted that pairs science and female erogenous zones. ... read more »

Flu Vaccination: Why So Many Questions This Year?

This year’s flu vaccination has stirred up many questions about how effective it truly is. ... read more »

New Graduate Breastfeeds Baby; Photo Stirs Controversy

The big surprise came later, when Thurman posted the photo of herself breastfeeding on graduation day to Black Women Do Breastfeed, an advocacy group that encourages black women to breastfeed. ... read more »

Chronic Pain Dampens Female Sex Drive

When women are in pain, they’re not often interested in sex. A team of Canadian researchers wanted to know more about how pain affects libido. ... read more »

Smaller Testicles Made Dad More Nurturing

Previous studies indicate a man’s fathering style is based on his level of testosterone, while a new study suggests the size of a man’s testicles is a tell-tale sign of fathering style, too. ... read more »

Newborn-Sized Dialysis Machine Saving Little Lives in Italy

Kidney problems severe enough to require dialysis affect fewer than 2% of all babies, who need the machines to cleanse toxins from the blood while their kidneys are too weak to do the job themselves. ... read more »

Maternal Depression Risk Greatest 4 Years After Childbirth

Researchers say the fourth year after delivering a baby are when the risk of maternal depression is highest of all. ... read more »

Foam Crib Mattresses Emit Toxic Fumes; Ventilation Important

A recent study of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) suggests it might be a healthy idea to let foam mattresses air out for about six months before putting a baby to sleep on it. ... read more »

The Fetal Brain: Now There’s a Map for That

A grant made it possible for a large team of researchers specializing in various fields of medicine and technology to map the fetal brain as its never been done before. ... read more »

12-Year Study Puts Measles Vaccine Fears to Rest

An exhaustive study of vaccines containing the measles virus found that the risk of seven adverse events many parents fear are unlikely to occur as a result of vaccination. ... read more »

Pap v. HPV Testing for Cervical Cancer Testing

The death rate of cervical cancer dropped dramatically, by approximately 74%, after the introduction of the Pap test in the 1940s. ... read more »

Keep Grandma Mentally Sharp; Let Her Babysit One Day a Week

Good news for grandma! Researchers recently discovered that postmenopausal grandmothers who babysit their grandchildren one day a week score highest on tests of mental acuity. ... read more »

Secondhand Smoke Adds Years to Kids’ Arteries

Most adults that smoke know it is bad for their health. What may be less widely understood is the harm the smoker does to the children he or she shares a home and an automobile with. ... read more »

Healthier Babies Born After Coal Plant Closes

The closing of a coal power plant in China provided an ideal opportunity to study effects of air pollution and childhood health. Women who became pregnant after the plant closed had healthier babies. ... read more »

Fewer Baby Boys Getting Circumcised in US: Good Idea?

A study of the lifelong effects of circumcision indicates fewer baby boys today are getting circumcised in the United States than in previous decades. ... read more »

Study Links Dad’s Alcohol Intake to Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

A new study from Korea indicates that dad’s drinking before conception may need some rethinking. ... read more »

Baby May Never Outgrow Atopic Dermatitis

Approximately 10% to 15% of kids in the United States will be diagnosed with atopic dermatitis (AD), usually before they turn two. ... read more »

NICU Volunteer “Cuddlers” Embrace Labor of Love

For some very lucky preemies, NICU volunteer 'cuddlers' come to the rescue. These volunteers are trained to hold and comfort NICU babies when parents and nurses can't be there. ... read more »

E-Cigarettes Not So Healthy Alternative

A new study suggests the need to re-think the safety of e-cigarettes. They aren't quite so safe for smokers or others in the vicinity. ... read more »

Early Childhood Neglect Changes Brain Size and Function

A Harvard professor of pediatrics says, 'neglect is awful for the brain'and that without affection, attention, and stimulation from a trustedsource, 'the wiring of the brain goes awry.' ... read more »

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Expected to Rise

Social scientists and epidemiologists warn of a growing number of babies being born with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) in coming years. ... read more »

Desire To Be Other Gender Higher in Autistic, ADHD Kids

Children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were found to be more inclined to wish they were the opposite gender. ... read more »

Saturated Fats Put Body Fat Where Heart, Diabetes Most Risky

Researchers in Sweden have discovered that some fats make us dangerously fat in the belly while another type is responsible for bulges elsewhere. ... read more »

Vitamin C Linked to Reduced Risk of Stroke

It's unclear at this time how vitamin C protects against stroke but it could help regulate blood pressure. ... read more »

Does Birth Order Influence Adult Health?

The first-born male child may be more prone to disease later in life than his younger siblings. ... read more »

Autistic Brains Never Stop, Stay Busy Even During Seep

A study has resulted in the discovery of what may be the key to understanding the deeply introspective nature of so many people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. ... read more »

Exercising Spouse Positively Impacts Other Spouse

Researchers in Baltimore may have discovered that when one spouse gets plenty of exercise, his or her spouse is more likely to exercise regularly, too. ... read more »

Schools Need Improved PE Classes for Every Kid, Every Day

Dr. Gregory D. Myer says if more attention were paid to quality in PE classes, grades and classroom behaviors would improve. So would children’s health. ... read more »

Not in the Mood? Sleep On It!

A new study indicates someone not in the mood should sleep on it for an extra hour tonight to improve libido tomorrow. ... read more »

HPV: Stem Cell Division Determines Cancer or Cure

The reason why some people find their HPV infections go away while others develop cancer has remained a mystery to medical science. ... read more »

Is Your Smartphone Making Your Brain Lazy?

The findings of a recent study indicate a growing reliance on smartphones to solve problems rather than thinking them through on brain power alone, a situation described as "cognitive miserliness." ... read more »

Future Cognitive Development Reflected in Newborn’s Eyes

A new study suggests there’s more than joy to be found in a newborn’s eyes. A baby’s gaze is a signal of how well his or her visual cognitive abilities will develop throughout early childhood. ... read more »

What Would You Do If Genetic Testing Revealed Future Illness?

What would you do if genetic testing revealed future catastrophic illness for yourself or a child? Would you want to know? ... read more »

Daytime Naps Maybe Not So Beneficial After Age 2

A new study provides sound scientific evidence that once a child reaches age 2, naps can be more trouble than they’re worth. ... read more »

More Evidence Antibiotics Are More Harmful Than Expected

Antibiotics are commonly prescribed to cure bacterial infections — and they usually do — but a growing body of evidence indicates antibiotics are more harmful than once expected. ... read more »

Angelina Jolie Has Ovaries Removed to Avert Hereditary Cancer

Jolie, 39, chose to publicize a preventive double mastectomy she had in 2013. ... read more »

ADHD Kids Learn Best While Fidgeting

The findings of a recent study suggests the need to rethink the way children with ADHD are managed in the classroom and says kids with ADHD learn best while they’re fidgeting. ... read more »

Limit Household Bleach for Healthier Children

Many parents turn to chlorine bleach for the cleanest clean but a new study indicates children are healthier when the use of household bleach is limited. ... read more »

Girls’ Autism Symptoms Usually Subtle, Delaying Diagnosis

A study finds that girls' symptoms of autism are so different than boys’ symptoms that girls are often misdiagnosed or their diagnosis comes much later than most boys’ diagnoses. ... read more »

Poor Parenting Plays Part in Bullying

According to researchers at the University of Warwick, bullying may be associated with poor parenting practices, including overprotective parenting. ... read more »

Whole-Body Vibration Platforms Damage Spine, Joint Tissue

High-frequency, low-amplitude whole-body vibration (WBV) platforms have become popular in recent years but a study urges caution; these “no work” workouts might not be so good on the joints. ... read more »

Exercising Teens Face Reduced Risk of Cancer in Middle Age

A recent study from Vanderbilt University has uncovered an added benefit of exercise: when girls were exercising regularly as teens, they faced a reduced risk of cancer when they reached middle age. ... read more »

Childhood Nightmares Could Signal Adolescent Psychosis

Persistent childhood nightmares — those that happen repeatedly or for a prolonged period of time — might signal the future development of troubling psychotic behaviors by age 18. ... read more »

Infant Surgery: Regional Better Than General Anesthesia

The currently preferred method to dull pain in infant surgery is general anesthesia (GA) but a recent study indicates less invasive anesthesia — regional anesthesia (RA) — may produce safer outcomes. ... read more »

Discovered: First Gene Strongly Associated with Autism

An international team of researchers has discovered a gene that is more strongly associated with autism than any other to date. ... read more »

Latest Birth Control Pills Increase Clot Risk

The newest version of the pill increases the risk of dangerous deep veinous thrombosis (DVT) blood clots. ... read more »

Surprise Finding: Preemies Face COPD in Mid-20s

Adults born prematurely (ex-preterms) and diagnosed with BPD are at increased for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). ... read more »

Female Viagra Gets FDA Approval; Critics Ask Why

Earlier this month, a panel of advisors for the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) voted 18-6 in favor of approval of a flibanserin, a pink pill touted as the “female Viagra.” ... read more »

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