Vaccination During Pregnancy

Vaccines are given to pregnant women to protect the mother and the baby against serious infectious diseases. When you get vaccinated, you are protecting yourself. And you are also sharing some early protection with the baby too. Both the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG) recommend that you get both the whooping cough (in the third trimester) and the flu vaccine (any time in pregnancy)  during each pregnancy to help protect yourself and your baby.

Whooping Cough Vaccination

The CDC recommends that you get the whooping cough vaccine (called Tdap vaccine) during the third trimester of each pregnancy. When you get the whooping cough vaccine in preegnancy, your body will create protective antibodies (proteins produced by the body to fight off diseases) that will protect both you and also pass some of them to your baby before birth that will help protect the baby after birth.

The Flu (Influenza) Vaccine

Both ACOG and the CDC recommend that all pregnant women receive the flu vaccine in pregnancy. The vaccine can be given any time and during any trimester of the pregnancy. The Flu is more likely to cause severe illness in pregnant women than in women who are not pregnant so giving it during pregnancy is essential in saving women's lives..  

Other Vaccines

Vaccines for Travel: You should talk to your doctor at least 4 to 6 weeks before your trip to discuss any special precautions or vaccines that you may need. 

Hepatitis B: If you develop Hepatitis B in pregnancy, or if you carry the hepatitis B virus,  then your baby  is at highest risk for becoming infected with hepatitis B during delivery. Talk to your healthcare professional about getting tested for hepatitis B and whether or not you should get vaccinated.  

Additional Vaccines: Some women may need other vaccines before, during, or after they become pregnant. For example, if you have a history of chronic liver disease, your doctor may recommend the hepatitis A vaccine. If you work in a lab, or if you are traveling to a country where you may be exposed to meningococcal disease, your doctor may recommend the meningococcal vaccine.