Benefits of Immediate NICU High-Frequency Breathing Support

One of the toughest hurdles that premature babies must overcome is breathing. Preemies almost always require breathing support in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). ... read more »

Coughs, Sneezes Spread Flu Germs Farther Than Expected

The gas cloud that forms after a cough or a sneeze is a lot more complicated than originally thought, according to a team of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). ... read more »

Dads Turn Baby Time into Personal Fitness Routines

Two fathers, in particular, have turned their baby time into personal fitness routines that benefit dad while entertaining baby. These fathers have even turned their baby-inspired workouts into books. ... read more »

40% of Infants Without Strong Parental Attachments

The emotional attachment a child develops for his or her parents by the age of 3 can be a valuable marker for how well the child will fare emotionally, socially, and academically later in childhood. ... read more »

Autism and Glutamate Receptors

Using data on the action of mGlu5 receptors on the cell's surface, pharmaceutical companies developed drugs that would lower the volume of the surface receptors and control autistic behavior. ... read more »

First Five Years of Fatherhood Risky for Depression

The study finds that young men, especially those that live in the same home as their new baby, are at significant risk of developing depression during the first five years of fatherhood. ... read more »

Dramatic Rise in E-Cig Calls to Poison Control Centers

Electronic cigarettes "represent an emerging public health concern, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). ... read more »

Anti-Anxiety Meds May “Rebalanced” Autistic Brains

A team of Seattle-based scientists found that the administration of certain anti-anxiety drugs seems to rebalance the autistic brain in ways that make impulse control more& effective. ... read more »

After Delivery: Risk of Clots, Stroke, Heart Attack

All women are at higher risk of stroke than men and that risk is especially high during and months after pregnancy. ... read more »

Should Technology Allow Parents to "Design" Their Babies?

Is modern science approaching the point where designing the baby of one's dreams becomes a reality? ... read more »

Should Newborn Screening Protocols Include Genome Sequencing?

Researchers at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, question the value of including genome sequencing to the standard regimen of tests given to newborn babies. ... read more »

Link Between Childhood Leukemia and a Genetic Mutation

A recent study of the genomes of children with a rare form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) found that this particular genetic mutation increases a child's risk of cancer by 2,700 times. ... read more »

PreNexa Prenatal Vitamins Added More DHA and Vitamin D

A pharmaceutical company, Upsher-Smith Laboratories, Inc., announced its introduction of a new formula for its prescription prenatal vitamins marketed under the registered trademark name PreNexa. ... read more »

Pregnancy Hormones Ease Chronic Pain

During pregnancy, childbirth, and thereafter, many women don't experience pain to the degree expected. Many who use opiates for pain management find they don't need as much of it during this time. ... read more »

Smoking Ban: Preterm Births and Asthma Hospitalizations Drop

Smoking bans are increasingly common in the last 3 decades. These bans have cleared the air and a recent study from the Netherlands indicates they've improved the health of newborns and children, too. ... read more »

Third-Hand Smoke: DNA Damage Risk for Infants and Toddlers

Third-hand smoke, the gunk that settles on floors, furniture, draperies, and even kids' toys, has the potential to damage DNA. ... read more »

Cluster of Rare Birth Defects in Washington

There's a mystery involving rare birth defects in a small rural area of Washington state that's pitting mothers and medical personnel against the state's health department. ... read more »

Should Pediatricians See Unvaccinated Kids?

The measles outbreak has left pediatricians facing a dilemma: should they see unvaccinated kids or turn them away so contagious diseases don't infect other patients too young to be fully vaccinated? ... read more »

Medications May Be Lethal to Small Children

We don't know how many commonly used prescription and over-the-counter drugs in use today are safe during pregnancy, nursing, and childhood but we do know many are lethal to small children. ... read more »

Lighting Up the Christmas Tree With Lead

One of the joys of Christmas is watching a child's face light up when Christmas tree lights are turned on. But is playing with them safe? ... read more »

Researchers Devise an Effective Autism Screening Tool

The sooner autism is diagnosed, the sooner treatment and coping strategies can begin. The sooner these therapies begin, the better the chance the child will thrive throughout life. A new study has found a way to assess a child's risk much sooner. Seems it's all about the tilt and size of the head. ... read more »

Baby Monitors: Selling Fear or True Protection?

Critics say baby monitors do little more than let you know if your baby is asleep or awake, in spite of the emotional marketing strategies that surround them. ... read more »

Babies May Gain Immunity at Conception

A recent study suggests a degree of immunity might also be conveyed to the baby at the time of its conception. ... read more »

Exposing Man to Arsenic through Rice

One of the most poisonous substances is arsenic; hence, it was a public health concern when a team of scientists published about consuming toxic levels of the element by eating rice. ... read more »

Parenting Style Influenced by Genetics

A team of researchers at Michigan State University (MSU) has conducted an in-depth study of parenting styles and concluded it has about as much to do with genetics as it does family tradition. ... read more »

Sweet Beverages — Not Foods — Linked to Endometrial Cancer

Several factors are thought to contribute to the development of endometrial cancer, but a new study reveals a potent new culprit: sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). ... read more »

Breastfeeding Stimulates Gut Flora

Infants begin developing their gastrointestinal microbiomes at birth by way of their mother's milk during breastfeeding. Their bodies take over production of microbiota once breastfeeding ends. ... read more »

International Study Recommends Ovary Removal by Age 35

For women who carry the BRCA1 gene mutation, the odds of getting ovarian cancer are 39 for every 100 BRCA+ women. Once disease develops, preventive ovary removal surgery by age 35 is the best defense. ... read more »

Baby Wipes May Be Cause of Persistent Rash

Moms everywhere have come to rely on products like baby wipes for infants and wet wipes for older children as an easy, convenient way to add an extra layer of cleanliness to a messy situation. ... read more »

Vaccinations Eradicate Rubella in Western Hemisphere

The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) seized the moment to announce the complete eradication of rubella in the Western Hemisphere. ... read more »

Shared Sleeping Infant Deaths: Texas Polar Vortex

The chilling antics of the polar vortex left Central Texas temperatures far below normal this winter. Texans bundled up to stay warm and cozy during a winter so cold it broke records. ... read more »

Possible Treatment Breakthrough: Fragile X Syndrome

Previous medical research has pinpointed the part of the cell affected by FXS but a new study reveals how the problem occurs. ... read more »

New Catheterization Procedure for Babies with Hole in Heart

Approximately 9 of every 1,000 people are born with some form of heart defect, the most common of which are septal defects. ... read more »

Autistic Children Sometimes Bond More Closely with Family Dog

Gretchen Carlise is a doctoral candidate at the Center for Human-Animal Interaction. Her dissertation explores the many ways a family dog can enhance the lives of autistic children. ... read more »

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