What is the Epigenome?

DNA modifications that do not change the DNA sequence can affect gene activity. Chemical compounds that are added to single genes can regulate their activity; these modifications are known as epigenetic changes. ... read more »

How do Geneticists Indicate the Location of a Gene?

Geneticists use maps to describe the location of a particular geneon a chromosome. One type of map uses the cytogenetic location todescribe a gene's position. ... read more »

What Did the Human Genome Project Accomplish?

In April 2003, researchers announced that the Human Genome Project had completed a high-quality sequence of essentially the entire human genome. This sequence closed the gaps from a working draft of the genome, which was published in 2001. ... read more »

What are the Next Steps in Genomic Research?

Discovering the sequence of the human genome was only the first step in understanding how the instructions coded in DNA lead to a functioning human being. The next stage of genomic research will begin to derive meaningful knowledge from the DNA sequence. ... read more »

What are Genome-wide Association Studies?

Genome-wide association studies are a relatively new way for scientists to identify genes involved in human disease. ... read more »

What is the International HapMap Project?

The International HapMap Project is an international scientific effort to identify common genetic variations among people. This project represents a collaboration of scientists from public and private organizations in six countries. ... read more »

What Advances are Being Made in DNA Sequencing?

Determining the order of DNA building blocks (nucleotides) in anindividual's genetic code, called DNA sequencing, has advanced the study of genetics and is one method used to test for genetic disorders. ... read more »

The Human Genome Project

The Human Genome Project ... read more »

What is a Genome?

A genome is an organism's complete set of DNA, including all of itsgenes. Each genome contains all of the information needed to build andmaintain that organism. ... read more »

What Were the Goals of the Human Genome Project?

The main goals of the Human Genome Project were to provide a complete and accurate sequence of the 3 billion DNA base pairs that make up the human genome and to find all of the estimated 20,000 to 25,000 human genes. ... read more »

Geneticist Sequences Unborn Son’s Entire Genome, Just for Fun

From the moment he knew he was going to be a father, Khan wanted to sequence his baby’s DNA to know more about his genetic makeup. ... read more »

Experts Recommend 3-Step Diagnostic Process for Autism

A new study of two different kinds of genetic tests identified ASD in a small number of patients, leading the test’s authors to recommend a 3-step diagnostic process when autism is suspected. ... read more »

Should Newborn Screening Protocols Include Genome Sequencing?

Researchers at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, question the value of including genome sequencing to the standard regimen of tests given to newborn babies. ... read more »

Genomic Research

Genomic Research ... read more »

Human Genome Project: Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications

The Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) program was founded in 1990 as an integral part of the Human Genome Project. ... read more »

What Was the Human Genome Project?

The Human Genome Project was an international research effort to determine the sequence of the human genome and identify the genes that it contains. The Project was coordinated by the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Department of Energy. ... read more »