Will IVF Affect the Baby?

Although in-vitro fertilization (IVF) is associated with a higher risk of preterm birth, researchers report no neuropsychological side effects from early birth at three years of age. ... read more »

Multiple Births May Cost More Than Single Births

Giving birth to multiple babies may cost parents more than single baby births do, according to a new study. Multiple births are a great concern in the United States and abroad because they pose significantly higher health risks to both mothers and infants. ... read more »

Mom's Blood Sugar Influences Child's Weight

An expectant mother's blood sugar levels affect how heavy her baby will be, according to a new study. ... read more »

Mealtime TV Between Mom and Baby and Obesity

Eating mindlessly while watching TV is a bad habit associated with obesity. It's especially concerning when pregnant women watch television while eating, according to a study recently presented. ... read more »

Maternal Smoking and Impact on Adult Offspring

Smoking during pregnancy and high maternal stress hormones increase the risk for nicotine dependence in daughters, according to a new study. ... read more »

Maternal Smoking and Psychological Traits in Offspring

Maternal smoking habits have been associated with multiple psychological issues in offspring, but researchers from the University of Missouri believe confounding factors may play a more important role than the direct effect of maternal smoking during pregnancy. ... read more »

Maternal Medical Society Explores Late-Term Hypertension

Babies born between weeks 39 and 40 of pregnancy have the most positive outcomes, according to the American College of Gynecologists (ACOG) and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. ... read more »

Maternal BPA Exposure and Prostate Cancer Risk

Exposure to BPA during pregnancy increases the risk of prostate cancer in male offspring, according to a new study. ... read more »

Mom's Depression Increases Depression Risk in Baby

A pregnant woman may pass depression onto her unborn child, according to a new study. Doctors have long suspected a connection between maternal depression and mood disorders in offspring; this research helps scientists understand how and when this occurs. ... read more »

Mom's High Testosterone and Language Delay in Baby

A new research study published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, claims male infants exposed to higher than normal levels of testosterone may be at increased risk of language delays. ... read more »

Study: Labor Induction After a Premature Rupture

When a pregnant woman's membranes rupture between the 34th and 37th week of gestation, labor is often induced to reduce the risk of fetal infection and/or breathing problems. ... read more »

Gestational Diabetes Links to Iron Deficiency in Newborns

Researchers from Wenzhou Medical College in China recently published a report on the status of neonatal iron deficiency in newborns born to mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). ... read more »

Inflammation During Pregnancy and Fetal Brain Development

The over-activation of a woman's immune system during pregnancy, such as when she has a cold or the flu, may influence the brain development of the child she carries. ... read more »

Imaging Technique for Alcohol-Related Birth Defects

Until now, limited research on embryos has prevented scientists from understanding how maternal use of alcohol causes congenital heart defects. ... read more »

Epidermal Growth Factor on Oxygen-Deprived Preemies

One very serious consequence of being born too soon is that the lungs are not mature enough to function properly. ... read more »

Female Intuition Linked to Testosterone Exposure in the Womb

A recent study indicates a woman’s intuition is based not on estrogen but on testosterone, and the degree of testosterone to which she was exposed in the womb. ... read more »

Tobacco and Marijuana Use in Low-Income Pregnancies

According to a study published in the Journal of Addiction, Research and Therapy, marijuana use in pregnancy may be more prevalent than tobacco use because pregnant women perceive the drug as a safer alternative to tobacco use. ... read more »

How Alcohol During Pregnancy Affects Fetal Brain Development

Neuroscientists at the University of California, Riverside, have found strong new evidence that consuming alcohol during pregnancy causes developmental problems in unborn babies. ... read more »

Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulation During Pregnancy, Risk of Preeclampsia

Cerebral circulation can be severely affected by preeclampsia. Researchers are not sure whether preeclampsia causes problems with cerebral autoregulation or if the issues are simply a precursor of preeclampsia. ... read more »

Alcohol in First Trimester of Pregnancy Harms Placenta

The link between a pregnant woman's drinking and fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is clearly established but 30% to 60% of all pregnant women in the world still consume alcohol while pregnant. ... read more »

Does Eating Fish While Pregnant Impact Child's Intelligence?

Fish is a food that many pregnant women avoid due to potential mercury content. Consumption of fish during pregnancy may positively impact cognitive development and social prowess. ... read more »

Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia and Neurocognitive Development

The object of a recent study from authors at Tufts University School of Medicine was to ascertain a connection between CDH (congenital diaphragmatic hernia) survival and neurocognitive development. The study was published in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery. ... read more »

Brain Chemicals May Predict Developmental Problems in Newborns

Scientists have discovered a new way to determine whether a preterm infant is at risk for motor development problems. ... read more »

Antidepressants and Newborn Lung Complications in Infants

A recent study indicates there is a small but increased risk of a particular lung condition the infant may develop when its mother takes an SSRI during the late stages of pregnancy. ... read more »

C-Sections Are More Likely in For-Profit Hospitals

Pregnant women may be receiving more C-sections to generate higher income for hospitals and doctors. ... read more »

Aspirin Helps With Occasional Antiphospholipid Antibodies

It is well known that treatment with aspirin plus heparin is effective for patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) to prevent pregnancy loss. ... read more »

Tylenol During Pregnancy and ADHD Risk

The general perception has been that it's OK to take Tylenol during pregnancy but a recent study of Danish mothers and their children suggests some rethinking may be in order. ... read more »

University Students Altered Birth Control Use to Avoid Menstruation

Hormonal birth control pills can be used to delay or eliminate some menstrual periods, especially for women who experience heavy bleeding or prolonged menstrual periods, but according to researchers, university students are altering birth control schedules. ... read more »

Privately Insured Americans: Diabetes Rise

Approximately 8.8 percent of insured Americans had diabetes or had a doctor tell them they were at risk for the disease in 2012 according to a new report by HCCI, the Health Care Cost Institute. This rate is up from 8.3 percent the previous year. ... read more »

Personal Care Products Pose Risk to Babies

Shampoos, lotions, and other baby care products expose babies and toddlers to potentially harmful substances at a great rate, according to a new study. ... read more »

Possible Treatment Breakthrough: Fragile X Syndrome

Previous medical research has pinpointed the part of the cell affected by FXS but a new study reveals how the problem occurs. ... read more »

New Catheterization Procedure for Babies with Hole in Heart

Approximately 9 of every 1,000 people are born with some form of heart defect, the most common of which are septal defects. ... read more »

Intracranial Germ Cell Tumor: Quality of Life

The chances of a pediatric patient surviving an intracranial germ cell tumor are high, leading researchers from Taiwan to question the effect of long-term survival on neuropsychological function and overall quality of life. ... read more »

Is Antibiotic-Laced Burger Meat Unhealthy?

A new study from Consumer Reports may suggest some rethinking about your beloved burger is in order. Industrial-scale beef producers include antibiotics as a daily part of their livestock’s diet. ... read more »

Minnesota Bans Hormone Disruptor Triclosan

Minnesota is the first state to ban all products containing triclosan, an antibacterial agent found in many household products and known to disrupt hormones in humans and harm the environment. ... read more »

Study: Nurses and Testicular Cancer Patients

Nurses are caregivers who provide support and information to patients in a clinical setting. In oncology, support may take on a sensitive note, especially with patients fighting testicular cancer. ... read more »

Avoid Food Allergies: 17 Weeks of Breast Milk

Seventeen seems to be the magic number to best protect a baby against the development of food allergies. A recent British study found that babies who are fed only breast milk until at least 17 weeks old are less likely to develop food allergies by age 2. ... read more »

Recent Study: My Most Embarrassing Baby Moment

Everyone’s parents have embarrassing or hilarious stories about their children that they love to tell friends. My mom’s best is the story about when I tried to dump an entire saltshaker into my mouth as a baby. ... read more »

Breastfeeding and Breast Cancer: How to Avoid it

Though no cure for breast cancer has been found yet, there are ways for women to avoid this debilitating disease and most of them revolve around living a healthy lifestyle. ... read more »

Slight Alteration in IVF Could Boost Success for Older Women

Dr. Yan-Guang Wu and his research team found the timing of egg retrieval is a key to success when treating older women. ... read more »

Pregnancy Expectation Off by Five Weeks

Perhaps no other time in life makes the countdown by week as important as it is during pregnancy when the 38-week mark is expected to mean a date with the delivery room. ... read more »

Implantation Failure: When Embryos Don’t Pass “Entrance Exam”

Recently, in an examination of the reproductive process, medical researchers in England discovered that we must pass the most important exam of all long before our birth. ... read more »

Ondansetron Not Associated with Fetal Side Effects in Pregnancy

Researchers from Denmark recently published a study into the drug Ondansetron, typically prescribed for pregnancy nausea and vomiting. The study used data collected by Denmark registries to review more than 600,000 singleton births. ... read more »

Women 35+ Less Likely to Have Babies with Anatomical Defects

A study revealed a decreased risk of anatomical defects by as much as 40% when the mother is older. ... read more »

Vitamin D Levels and Birth Weight

According to researchers from the University of Pittsburgh, pregnant women with lower than normal vitamin D levels during pregnancy are more likely to give birth to infants falling into the low birth weight category. ... read more »

Vision Affected by Chemicals in Water

Researchers have found a chemical in water that may damage the vision of your unborn child if you come in contact with the chemical during pregnancy. The chemical is called tetrachloroethylene or PCE. ... read more »

Sibling Study Questions Merits of Breastfeeding

Dr. Cynthia Colen wasn’t satisfied with the studies of the merits of breastfeeding versus bottle feeding that she sees in her work. ... read more »

Salivary Markers Do Not Predict Pain in Newborns

Researchers in Japan recently published a study in the journal Early Human Development involving 47 newborns, all healthy and between three and four days old. The authors tested salivary biomarkers for hormonal changes in response to pain. ... read more »

Preventing Infant Malarial Deaths

According to a team of researchers in the tropics, infant deaths associated with malaria may be preventable. When a pregnant woman contracts malaria, blood vessels to the placenta do not develop correctly and cannot provide adequate blood flow to the fetus. ... read more »

PAX3 Gene May Be Linked to Birth Defects in Diabetic Mother

A team of researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center have identified an enzyme that may increase the likelihood of birth defects in children born to mothers with diabetes. The enzyme, known as AMPK, signals cells to stop producing a specific gene, PAX3. ... read more »

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