Increasing Rate of C-Section May be Linked to Impatience

Since 1996, rates of C-sections have risen 50%. While C-sections are deemed necessary for multiple reasons, some experts believe impatience, both in a clinical sense and personal sense, may play some part in the consistent rise in C-sections. ... read more »

Acupuncture and Pregnancy Rates

Acupuncture given with embryo transfer improves rates of pregnancy and live birth among women undergoing in vitro fertilisation. ... read more »

Caffeine Consumption and Miscarriage

Drinking coffee and caffeine early in pregnancy may increase your risk of miscarriage and spontaneous abortion. ... read more »

Snoring and Pregnancy Gestational Diabetes

A new study from researchers at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine has found that women who reported frequent snoring during their pregnancy were more likely to develop gestational diabetes. ... read more »

Hurricane Exposure: Impact on Fetal Stress

Women and infants who lived through Hurricane Andrew may help predict the long-term effects of hurricanes on health. ... read more »

Lifetime Autism Price Tag $2 Million Plus

A study puts the lifelong price tag for living with autism at roughly $2.4 million (£1.414 million). ... read more »

Scientists Create Menstruating Mice for Endometriosis Study

Endometriosis is characterized by lesions of uterine tissue that grow outside of the uterus. ... read more »

Cause of Pain in Women with Endometriosis

Researchers know little about how pelvis pain is caused in women with endometriosis. In a recent study published in the Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, researchers suggest neural growth factors may play a part in the development of endometrial pain. ... read more »

SSRIs May Not Help Adults Who Had Early Life Stress

Unfortunately, SSRIs don’t work for everybody. Dr. Jeremy D. Coplan noticed SSRIs often don’t work on depression patients who had experienced early life stresses. ... read more »

Better Prenatal Care with More Pregnancy Tests

Providing women who are having unprotected sex with a home pregnancy test could have a substantial impact on the health of potential newborns. ... read more »

Contraceptive Gel May Soon Replace Pills

Researchers are studying the effects of a contraceptive gel that could be used in place of pill contraceptives. ... read more »

Maternal Diabetes May Increase Risk of C-Section Delivery

Half of the women who have diabetes prior to becoming pregnant, undergo C-sections that could have been avoided. ... read more »

Children Conceived via IVF are Just as Smart as Their Peers

According to a report published by the University of Iowa, children conceived through in-vitro fertilization (IVF) are just as smart as their naturally conceived peers. ... read more »

Are Cell Phones Causing Behavioral Problems in Kids?

A study of about 30,000 children is suggesting cell phone use could be the cause of behavioral problems in certain children. ... read more »

Plastics and Pesticides May Increase Risk of Infertility

A new study reveals that women working directly with pesticides and plasticizers may have less chance of getting pregnant. ... read more »

Does Alcohol-Free Mouth Wash Reduce Risk of Preterm Birth?

Researchers presented a study at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine yearly meet-up, The Pregnancy Meeting, regarding the possible benefits of using alcohol-free mouthwash to reduce preterm labor. ... read more »

Weight Gain Guidelines Adjusted for Obese Patients

Women who enter pregnancy with a BMI in the obese range may have less weight to gain to stay within normal limits, according to a study presented at The Pregnancy Meeting in San Francisco. ... read more »

Changes in Vaginal pH May Indicate Premature Delivery

The pH of the vagina may be a good indicator of complications to come. During a model project spanning from 2004 to 2006, pregnant patients were asked to use test gloves to measure the pH of the vagina twice a week for 20 weeks. ... read more »

A Simple Hormone Test May Predict IVF Outcome

Researchers have found a hormone test to predict the potential outcome of in-vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures. ... read more »

Acupuncture Increasing Fertility Rates

According to new research, women prescribed clomid or clomiphene, may have another secret weapon in the fight against infertility. It appears that acupuncture, when used with medication therapy, can increase fertility and pregnancy. ... read more »

Pregnancy Blood Clots on the Rise with IVF

According to a recent study published in BMJ, women who conceive with the help of IVF are more likely to suffer blood blots than women who conceive naturally. ... read more »

Vitamin D Levels Affect IVF Success

According to the study, published in CMAJ Open, women with adequate vitamin D levels are more likely to conceive with IVF than women with lower than adequate levels. ... read more »

Mothers of NICU Newborns Lacking Privacy

Despite smaller patient numbers and secluded environments, neonatal intensive care units (NICU) are not the best places for breastfeeding mothers, according to a new study from researchers at the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. ... read more »

In-Vitro Maturation in Subfertile PCOS Patients

Researchers recently reviewed clinical trials and literature regarding the effects of in-vitro maturation on assisted reproduction success in women with subfertility associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). ... read more »

Marijuana Use Doubles Risk of Premature Birth

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have completed an international study into possible risk factors for premature birth. Premature or preterm birth is considered one of the most avoidable pregnancy complications ' in some cases. ... read more »

Daily Baby Aspirin Could Lower Preeclampsia Risk

To reduce preeclampsia, a new study recommends certain pregnant women be routinely prescribed a regimen of one 81-milligram of aspirin — a baby aspirin — beginning at the 12th week of pregnancy. ... read more »

One Stillborn Pregnancy May Lead to Another

If a pregnancy ends with a stillbirth, the woman is more likely to suffer another stillbirth in the future, according to new research published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. ... read more »

Low-Fat Yogurt May Cause Asthma and Hay Fever

Researchers have found a connection between eating low-fat yogurt during pregnancy and an increased risk of hay fever and/or asthma in their children. ... read more »

Nursing Moms Extremely Defensive of Babies

According to a report published in Psychological Science, nursingmothers are just as protective of their infants as 'mama bears.' ... read more »

Breastfeeding May Curb Behavior Problems

An Oxford University study has revealed that breastfeeding may be related to improved behavior, in addition to the various health benefits of breastmilk. The results of the study were published in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. ... read more »

Breastmilk Impacts Physical Development and Condition

Breastfeeding is the healthiest form of nutrition for babies, but according to researchers, breastmilk provides more than just nutrients for your growing baby. A recent study reveals a connection between adolescent physical health and breastfeeding. ... read more »

Autism Symptoms Affected by Birth Timing

Researchers at Michigan State University has revealed a connection between pre-term and post-term delivery and certain autism symptoms. ... read more »

Psychosocial Correlates of Exclusive Breastfeeding

The World Health Organization (WHO) suggests at least six months of breastfeeding to ensure optimal health and well-being for every infant, though a small percentage of mothers breastfeed for this length of time. ... read more »

The Link Between Oral Contraceptives and Prostate Cancer

Researchers have published their findings in BMJ Open linking prostate cancer with the use of oral contraceptives, such as birth control pills. ... read more »

Emphatic Skills Improve Patient/Physician Relationship

Emphatic skills, including socialization, empathy and communication style are important to creating that initial bond of trust between patient and physician in all medical settings. ... read more »

Sensorineural Hearing Loss After Passing Newborn Screen

A new study recently published in the JAMA Network journal Otolarynology ' Head and Neck Surgery, brings to light the inconsistencies betweennewborn screening results and childhood hearing. ... read more »

Parenteral Therapy Resistance and Tubo-Ovarian Abscess (TOA)

Parenteral therapy bypasses the gastrointestinal system and hits the circulatory system directly. Researchers from the Yokohama City University Medical Center have attempted to find risk factors that could predict therapy resistance in tubo-ovarian abscess (TOA). ... read more »

Safety of Indomethacin IUD: Random Control Study

Researchers from the China-Japan Friendship Hospital report indomethacin IUD are effective and carry a low risk of complications, including expulsion, bleeding and pain. ... read more »

Are BRCA 1/2 Mutations Associated with Early Onset Menopause?

Researchers from the Department of Obstetrics at UC San Francisco recently published a study testing a possible connection between BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations and early onset menopause. ... read more »

Abdominopelvic Tuberculosis Mimics AOC and PID

Doctors and researchers in the Jiangsu Province in China note 28 cases of Abdominopelvic Tuberculosis (TB) commonly misdiagnosed as advanced ovarian cancer (AOC) or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). ... read more »

Role of Socioeconomic Status on Maternal Depression

Quality of life, for pregnant women and new mothers, can be affected by depression. Research also points to negative side effects on newborn growth and development when depression is an issue for new mothers. ... read more »

Apnea in Children Hospitalized With Bronchiolitis

Researchers from the Department of Pediatrics at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center in California recently published a study that aimed to find common characteristics that increased the risk of apnea in children admitted to the hospital with bronchiolitis. ... read more »

Flu Vaccination Not Just Safe But Protective During Pregnancy

Their findings, recently published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, proved better than anticipated. The flu vaccine is not just safe for mother and baby, it's actually protective of the baby, too. ... read more »

Promiscuous Moms May Produce Sexier Sons, In Mice

A promiscuous mother may produce sons that are more appealing to female mice, according to a new study. Female mice are attracted to pheromones present in the urine of male mice. ... read more »

A Bone Hormone May Influence Brain Development and Cognition

Researchers discovered that the skeleton exerts a powerful influence on brain development and cognitive function in unborn mice. Findings in mice studies could eventually lead to new approaches to the prevention and treatment of certain neurological disorders in humans. ... read more »

Newborns Aware of Their Own Existence on Day Two

One question many parents ponder is when does this glorious littleperson know it is indeed a separate and unique human being. When doesthe sense of self come into a baby's existence? ... read more »

Scientists Develop New Method to Understand Chlamydia

Scientists have developed a new way to track the activity of a microbe and the response of its intended host cell. ... read more »

Father's Diabetes May Cause Low Birth Weight

  Babies with a low birth weight are likely to have a father with late-onset diabetes, according to new research. Published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, this is one of the first studies to use information from the large, long-term study, UK Biobank.  ... read more »

PTSD Symptoms Increase Risk for Obesity in Women

Women who suffer symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorde (PTSD) are at higher risk for becoming obese, according to a new study published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry. This research was the first to show that the symptoms of PTSD can contribute to obesity. ... read more »

Too Much Sports May be Bad for Adolescent Well-Being

Health professionals are promoting exercise to help curb rising childhood obesity rates but results from a new study show that getting too much exercise might actually be bad for a child's health. ... read more »

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