Women's Health News and Studies

Hello, Flu Season!

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) say the vaccine for the 2015-2015 flu season is right on target and should provide better protection this year than last. ... read more »

Fend Off Diabetes with High-Protein Breakfast

A nutritional study from Missouri finds that a breakfast high in protein will fend off the dangerous spikes in glucose and insulin that often lead to diabetes. ... read more »

Diet Soft Drinks Linked to Diabetes, Heart Disease

Recent studies indicate that adults and teenagers who regularly drink diet beverages tend to be overweight and at increased risk for metabolic syndrome, a forerunner for heart disease and diabetes. ... read more »

NIH: New Drugs Must Be Tested on Both Sexes

The National Institutes of Health want to see changes made in the way medical researchers in the U.S. conduct scientific studies. At the moment, the vast majority of tests are conducted on males. ... read more »

Yoga Mat Chemical in Hundreds of Everyday Food Products

The sandwich chain, Subway, made headlines in recent days for announcing it would no longer use a tongue-twisting synthetic chemical in the loaves of bread made and sold at its sandwich shops. ... read more »

Summer Water Safety: Breath-Holding Contests Can Be Dangerous

Breath-holding contests seem like an innocent rite of passage but some high-profile drownings by expert swimmers in recent years have illustrated the dangers involved with holding breath too long. ... read more »

Food and Beverage Packages Source of Toxic Chemical Exposure

A group of scientists has published its concerns for the safety of the packaging materials used in the food and beverage supply. ... read more »

US Kids Not Drinking Enough Water; Health Consequences Rising

A recent study from the Harvard University TH Chan School of Public Health reveals that children in the United States just aren’t drinking enough water for optimum physical and mental health. ... read more »

Improve Breakfast Quality to Improve Kids’ Grades

A new study is re-igniting the breakfast conversation and it comes with scientific evidence that when breakfast quality improves, kids’ grades do, too. ... read more »

New Owner Raises Toxoplasmosis Drug by 5,000+% Overnight

Shkreli made headlines around the world after changing the per-pill price of a little-known drug from $13.50 to $750, a price increase of more than 5,000% overnight. ... read more »

Gene Expression, Not Mutation, Linked to Endometriosis

A new study of the genetics of endometriosis may prove to be a turning point in how the disease is diagnosed and treated. ... read more »

Live Healthier with 7 Fruit, Veggie Servings a Day

The government of the United Kingdom recommends it's citizens consume five servings of fruits and/or vegetables every day for optimum health. A new study says mores better. ... read more »

8 Ways to Beat the Heat from an Emergency Medicine Expert

Gardeners, sports enthusiasts, and adults monitoring kids at play need to be on alert for signs of illness and take every precaution to prevent harm caused by heat stress. ... read more »

Gelatin in Flu Shots Trigger Allergic Reactions

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends a flu shot every year for everyone 6 months old or older. ... read more »

ADHD: Real Diagnosis or Provocative Sales Pitch?

It's been more than 50 years since Dr. Keith Conners first started hiscampaign to convince other doctors and parents that the 'bad seed' kidmay actually suffer a neurological disorder. His message was heard andnow he regrets it. ... read more »

Read Labels: Soybean Oil Linked to Excess Pounds

Scientists are conducting a series of tests that compare the pros and cons of various fats and oils. They find that some fats, such as soybean oil, are linked to more excess pounds than others. ... read more »

Dad’s Folic Acid Consumption May Be Vital To Baby’s Health

Gentlemen, please eat your greens. And cereal, fruits, and veggies. Your children's lives may depend on it. ... read more »

Water Before Meals Washes the Pounds Away

Want to lose a few pounds? A new study from England indicates one easy way to do so is to turn to the kitchen tap for an effective weight loss strategy. ... read more »

Here's How Hot Chili Peppers Melt Away the Pounds

Did you ever notice you eat less when a meal is hot, spicy, and laced with chili peppers? A new study confirms that, yes, it’s the chilies’ fault but it’s not because of the blazing taste buds. ... read more »

Probiotics No Help for Colicky Babies

A new study, conducted a little differently than most, indicates that probiotics are actually no help with colicky babies in most cases. ... read more »

HIV-Positive Infant Cured

In a small town in Mississippi, a mother reports to the hospital in labor. She has received no prenatal care and has no idea she is HIV-positive. When her infant is born, HIV tests are positive and suggest the infant contracted the virus in utero. ... read more »

BPA Exposure Affects Behavior in Girls

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a plastic additive known to cause health problems in infants. ... read more »

Lower Sexual Interest in Postpartum Women

After giving birth, women often report having lower sexual interest. It is often accepted as just being a part of giving birth and moving from pregnant woman to new mom. The revelation could help women feel less negative about looming sexual interest. ... read more »

Fatherhood Packs on the Pounds

Most men gain a little weight after they get married. A new study indicates fatherhood packs on the pounds, too. Each added pound puts a man closer to the health risks associated with excess weight. ... read more »

Home-Improvement DIYers Risk Toxic Dust Exposure

A study measured dust levels when common DIY tasks are done and found these projects to be a lot dirtier work than might be expected. Pregnancy is not the time to be a hands-on DIY participant. ... read more »

Sugar is Bigger Heart Attack Risk Than Eggs

A very large-scale study, involving tens of thousands of Americans, revealed recently that it's sugar, not the fat in the egg yolks you crave, that increases the risk for heart disease. ... read more »

1 in 6 Kids Suffers Neurodevelopmental Disorder

One in six American children suffers from a neurodevelopmental disorder, including but not limited to, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorders ASD), or delays in speech and language. ... read more »

Anti-Vaxxers Reconsider After Learning Measles Complications

Many efforts to change the minds of anti-vaxxers focus on the safety of vaccination. This approach isn’t very effective and often encourages parents to become even more adamantly opposed. ... read more »

Study Shows Reproductive Problems After Antibiotic Treatment

In many cases, animal studies are completed before human studies are funded. In this case, an animal study on the antibiotic tetracycline provides enough base information on possible fertility problems to support further study in the human population. ... read more »

6+ Months Breastfeeding Lowers Early Breast Cancer Risk

A study of 504 breast cancer patients indicates breastfeeding for six months or longer can delay the onset or reduce the risk of early breast cancer even when early breast cancer runs in the family. ... read more »

Benefits of Immediate NICU High-Frequency Breathing Support

One of the toughest hurdles that premature babies must overcome is breathing. Preemies almost always require breathing support in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). ... read more »

Dads Turn Baby Time into Personal Fitness Routines

Two fathers, in particular, have turned their baby time into personal fitness routines that benefit dad while entertaining baby. These fathers have even turned their baby-inspired workouts into books. ... read more »

Coughs, Sneezes Spread Flu Germs Farther Than Expected

The gas cloud that forms after a cough or a sneeze is a lot more complicated than originally thought, according to a team of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). ... read more »

Sun Bunnies Beware: Your Sunscreen Probably Doesn’t Work

Summertime is big business for sunscreen products but an annual survey indicates they either don’t work as advertised or they contain products you’d probably rather not put on your skin. ... read more »

Fertility Awareness Among Organ Transplant Women

According to researchers in Nebraska and New York, female transplant patients are not adequately informed about fertility issues, contraception and chance of pregnancy after a solid organ transplant. ... read more »

Cancer Treatment in the Premenopausal Woman

Researchers believe keystone research into ovarian reserve, markers are crucial to the future of reproductive medicine. Thousands of women undergo cancer treatments each year, some of which affects fertility by destroying follicles that play a crucial part in egg maturation and overall fertility. ... read more »

Circumcision Safest During First Year

Male circumcision is the surgical removal of the prepuce (foreskin) of the penis. The practice has been controversial for ages. The safety of circumcision was put to the test in a recent study. ... read more »

Increasing Mean Arterial Blood Pressure in Preterm Infants

A study in the Archives of Diseases in childhood reports a possible new treatment for increasing mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) in preterm infants. Doctors administered tocolytic indomethacin to 18 mothers in preterm labor. ... read more »

Healthy Diet Regulates Body’s Sleep and Wake Cycle

The interesting findings of a recent study suggest that everyone - pregnant or not - may enjoy better quality sleep if we pay close attention to counting calories rather than counting sheep. ... read more »

Dramatic Rise in E-Cig Calls to Poison Control Centers

Electronic cigarettes "represent an emerging public health concern, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). ... read more »

Mom vs. Dad Baby Talk and Child Development

A recent study from Washington State University (WSU) explored the different ways different people speak to young children and how these communication differences affect or influence the child. ... read more »

Streptococcus Bacteria and Premature Births

Pediatric researchers at the San Diego School of Medicine in California have discovered a link between a particular strain of the Streptococcus bacteria and premature births. ... read more »

Sugar Industry Used Same Danger-Denying Tactics as Tobacco

The researchers are using their findings to lobby public health policymakers to tighten their recommendations for acceptable sugar intake for people of all ages around the world. ... read more »

Genetic Similarity Between Autism and Schizophrenia

New discoveries of genetic mutations link autism, schizophrenia, certain seizure disorders, and certain intellectual disabilities as stemming from a common origin. ... read more »

False-Positive Mammogram Results Trigger Lingering Anxiety

A Swedish study finds the stress and anxiety generated by a false-positive mammogram can linger as long as a year. ... read more »

40% of Infants Without Strong Parental Attachments

The emotional attachment a child develops for his or her parents by the age of 3 can be a valuable marker for how well the child will fare emotionally, socially, and academically later in childhood. ... read more »

Autism and Glutamate Receptors

Using data on the action of mGlu5 receptors on the cell's surface, pharmaceutical companies developed drugs that would lower the volume of the surface receptors and control autistic behavior. ... read more »

Bisphenol A and Testicular Cancer

Bisphenol A, a chemical used in the production of plastics, has been on the hot seat for more than a year. The chemical has been banned in Europe as of January 2011. France is following suit with a plan in place to ban Bisphenol A in the food market by July 2015. ... read more »

First Five Years of Fatherhood Risky for Depression

The study finds that young men, especially those that live in the same home as their new baby, are at significant risk of developing depression during the first five years of fatherhood. ... read more »

Sitting Linked to Bone, Breast, Ovarian Cancer

A new study from the American Cancer Society revealed an increased risk of cancer for women who spend lots of their leisurely moments sitting down. ... read more »

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