Women's Health News and Studies

HIV-Positive Infant Cured

In a small town in Mississippi, a mother reports to the hospital in labor. She has received no prenatal care and has no idea she is HIV-positive. When her infant is born, HIV tests are positive and suggest the infant contracted the virus in utero. ... read more »

BPA Exposure Affects Behavior in Girls

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a plastic additive known to cause health problems in infants. ... read more »

Probiotics No Help for Colicky Babies

A new study, conducted a little differently than most, indicates that probiotics are actually no help with colicky babies in most cases. ... read more »

Home-Improvement DIYers Risk Toxic Dust Exposure

A study measured dust levels when common DIY tasks are done and found these projects to be a lot dirtier work than might be expected. Pregnancy is not the time to be a hands-on DIY participant. ... read more »

Sugar is Bigger Heart Attack Risk Than Eggs

A very large-scale study, involving tens of thousands of Americans, revealed recently that it's sugar, not the fat in the egg yolks you crave, that increases the risk for heart disease. ... read more »

1 in 6 Kids Suffers Neurodevelopmental Disorder

One in six American children suffers from a neurodevelopmental disorder, including but not limited to, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorders ASD), or delays in speech and language. ... read more »

Anti-Vaxxers Reconsider After Learning Measles Complications

Many efforts to change the minds of anti-vaxxers focus on the safety of vaccination. This approach isn’t very effective and often encourages parents to become even more adamantly opposed. ... read more »

6+ Months Breastfeeding Lowers Early Breast Cancer Risk

A study of 504 breast cancer patients indicates breastfeeding for six months or longer can delay the onset or reduce the risk of early breast cancer even when early breast cancer runs in the family. ... read more »

Study Shows Reproductive Problems After Antibiotic Treatment

In many cases, animal studies are completed before human studies are funded. In this case, an animal study on the antibiotic tetracycline provides enough base information on possible fertility problems to support further study in the human population. ... read more »

Benefits of Immediate NICU High-Frequency Breathing Support

One of the toughest hurdles that premature babies must overcome is breathing. Preemies almost always require breathing support in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). ... read more »

Coughs, Sneezes Spread Flu Germs Farther Than Expected

The gas cloud that forms after a cough or a sneeze is a lot more complicated than originally thought, according to a team of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). ... read more »

Dads Turn Baby Time into Personal Fitness Routines

Two fathers, in particular, have turned their baby time into personal fitness routines that benefit dad while entertaining baby. These fathers have even turned their baby-inspired workouts into books. ... read more »

Fertility Awareness Among Organ Transplant Women

According to researchers in Nebraska and New York, female transplant patients are not adequately informed about fertility issues, contraception and chance of pregnancy after a solid organ transplant. ... read more »

Cancer Treatment in the Premenopausal Woman

Researchers believe keystone research into ovarian reserve, markers are crucial to the future of reproductive medicine. Thousands of women undergo cancer treatments each year, some of which affects fertility by destroying follicles that play a crucial part in egg maturation and overall fertility. ... read more »

Sun Bunnies Beware: Your Sunscreen Probably Doesn’t Work

Summertime is big business for sunscreen products but an annual survey indicates they either don’t work as advertised or they contain products you’d probably rather not put on your skin. ... read more »

Increasing Mean Arterial Blood Pressure in Preterm Infants

A study in the Archives of Diseases in childhood reports a possible new treatment for increasing mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) in preterm infants. Doctors administered tocolytic indomethacin to 18 mothers in preterm labor. ... read more »

False-Positive Mammogram Results Trigger Lingering Anxiety

A Swedish study finds the stress and anxiety generated by a false-positive mammogram can linger as long as a year. ... read more »

Streptococcus Bacteria and Premature Births

Pediatric researchers at the San Diego School of Medicine in California have discovered a link between a particular strain of the Streptococcus bacteria and premature births. ... read more »

Healthy Diet Regulates Body’s Sleep and Wake Cycle

The interesting findings of a recent study suggest that everyone - pregnant or not - may enjoy better quality sleep if we pay close attention to counting calories rather than counting sheep. ... read more »

Sugar Industry Used Same Danger-Denying Tactics as Tobacco

The researchers are using their findings to lobby public health policymakers to tighten their recommendations for acceptable sugar intake for people of all ages around the world. ... read more »

Dramatic Rise in E-Cig Calls to Poison Control Centers

Electronic cigarettes "represent an emerging public health concern, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). ... read more »

Genetic Similarity Between Autism and Schizophrenia

New discoveries of genetic mutations link autism, schizophrenia, certain seizure disorders, and certain intellectual disabilities as stemming from a common origin. ... read more »

40% of Infants Without Strong Parental Attachments

The emotional attachment a child develops for his or her parents by the age of 3 can be a valuable marker for how well the child will fare emotionally, socially, and academically later in childhood. ... read more »

Sitting Linked to Bone, Breast, Ovarian Cancer

A new study from the American Cancer Society revealed an increased risk of cancer for women who spend lots of their leisurely moments sitting down. ... read more »

Autism and Glutamate Receptors

Using data on the action of mGlu5 receptors on the cell's surface, pharmaceutical companies developed drugs that would lower the volume of the surface receptors and control autistic behavior. ... read more »

First Five Years of Fatherhood Risky for Depression

The study finds that young men, especially those that live in the same home as their new baby, are at significant risk of developing depression during the first five years of fatherhood. ... read more »

Customized Technology for Autistic Kids

There’s a very interesting collaboration going on in Kansas. It’s bringing together the best of several worlds for the benefit of kids who are autistic or developmentally challenged in various ways. ... read more »

Longterm Consequences of Childhood Bullying

Being bullied is not a harmless rite of passage or an inevitable part of growing up; it has serious long-term consequences. ... read more »

Bisphenol A and Testicular Cancer

Bisphenol A, a chemical used in the production of plastics, has been on the hot seat for more than a year. The chemical has been banned in Europe as of January 2011. France is following suit with a plan in place to ban Bisphenol A in the food market by July 2015. ... read more »

Mom and Dad Experience Brain Changes After Baby

The brains of the homosexual fathers changed most of all, responding to their child’s signals the way heterosexual mothers and heterosexual fathers responded. ... read more »

Effect of IBD on Fertility and Breastfeeding

Patients treated for IBD often have questions about the effect of treatment on fertility, pregnancy, and breastfeeding. Researchers from Spain recently examined this issue and published the subsequent report in the Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology. ... read more »

Hormones and Endometrial Cancer in Postmenopausal Women

Past studies have proven a direct relationship between obesity and increased risk of endometrial cancer. Researchers from National Cancer Institute and National Institutes of Health recently published the results of the study in the journal Endocrine-Related Cancer. ... read more »

Educational Support for Children of Resolved Autism

A new study reveals some cognitive and social symptoms of autism may linger and require on-going educational support for best long-term outcomes. ... read more »

Why Chromosomal Birth Defects More Likely in Older Mothers

A team of research scientists has recently discovered a new clue in the mystery of why chromosomal birth defects, like those that cause Down syndrome, are more likely to occur in older mothers. ... read more »

OTC Pain-Relievers Show Promise Preventing Recurrent UTIs

As many as 40% of women who experience a UTI will have recurrent episodes. A recent study suggests prevention of recurrent UTIs could soon be just a store shelf away. ... read more »

Combination Antiretroviral Use in HIV Transmission

Preventing mother-infant transmission of HIV is an important focus of third-world countries like Zambia. In Zambia, mother-infant transmission accounts for nearly 500,000 new HIV cases per year, according to 2009 statistics. ... read more »

Anti-Anxiety Meds May “Rebalanced” Autistic Brains

A team of Seattle-based scientists found that the administration of certain anti-anxiety drugs seems to rebalance the autistic brain in ways that make impulse control more& effective. ... read more »

Phosphates and Soda Linked to Hypertension

A diet high in phosphates causes the production of FGF23 to go into overdrive, producing more than the kidneys can handle; cardiovascular disease can soon follow. ... read more »

Parents Pushing for Autism Coverage from Obamacare

Enactment of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) leaves coverage of autism and many other medical issues up to state exchanges to establish the details of coverage if any. ... read more »

Smoking Ban: Preterm Births and Asthma Hospitalizations Drop

Smoking bans are increasingly common in the last 3 decades. These bans have cleared the air and a recent study from the Netherlands indicates they've improved the health of newborns and children, too. ... read more »

Solvent Exposure Before First Pregnancy: Breast Cancer Risk

Young women exposed to organic solvents before their first full-term pregnancy are at an increased risk of developing hormone receptor-positive breast cancer if it runs in the family. ... read more »

Oxytocin May Help Children with Autism

A single dose of oxytocin enhances brain activity while children with autism engage in social information, according to results of a recent study performed by researchers from Yale University. ... read more »

After Delivery: Risk of Clots, Stroke, Heart Attack

All women are at higher risk of stroke than men and that risk is especially high during and months after pregnancy. ... read more »

Should Newborn Screening Protocols Include Genome Sequencing?

Researchers at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, question the value of including genome sequencing to the standard regimen of tests given to newborn babies. ... read more »

Ring Finger Length and Future Health Problems

For ages, the length of the ring finger has been the topic of medical attention, but ring finger length is mentioned in history far before modern medicine. Culturally, men with longer ring fingers were considered more fertile and thus more sought after as life-long mates. ... read more »

Link Between Childhood Leukemia and a Genetic Mutation

A recent study of the genomes of children with a rare form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) found that this particular genetic mutation increases a child's risk of cancer by 2,700 times. ... read more »

PreNexa Prenatal Vitamins Added More DHA and Vitamin D

A pharmaceutical company, Upsher-Smith Laboratories, Inc., announced its introduction of a new formula for its prescription prenatal vitamins marketed under the registered trademark name PreNexa. ... read more »

Roseroot: Natural and Effective for Depression

The results of the study found roseroot to be almost as effective in treating mild to moderate major depressive disorder (MDD) but with far fewer adverse side effects that turn patients away. ... read more »

Wrong Foods and Time On The Menu Lead To Obesity and Diabetes

A recent study indicates eating big meals at night, especially when they’re meals big in unhealthy foods, throws off the body clock. ... read more »

Behavioral Assessment in VLBW Infants

The Infant Behavioral Assessment and Intervention Program (IBAIP) supports cognitive and physical development of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. ... read more »

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