Pregnancy News and Studies

You Simply Will NOT Believe the Story of These Triplets!

Sarah and Bill Imbierowicz wanted to be parents but it proved to be a mission easier said than done. They turned to in vitro fertilization (IVF) but that didn't really work as expected. ... read more »

Effects of Carbon Monoxide on Cytokine Production

Researchers from various hospitals in New York recently published a report in the American Journal of Reproductive Immunology claiming carbon monoxide may reduce inflammation and thus reduce the impact of the infection. ... read more »

Depression During Pregnancy and Gestational Diabetes Risk

A recent British study revealed a strong link between depression and inactivity during pregnancy and the tendency to gain excess pregnancy pounds and develop gestational diabetes. ... read more »

New Studies Confirm Importance of Placenta for Pregnancy Health

The placenta is one of the most mystifying organs in the human body. It is the only organ that can be grown in an adult body and every child’s life depends on it. Study of the placenta is difficult. ... read more »

3-Minute Cord Cutting Delay Boosts Brain Development Later

Traditionally, the umbilical cord is cut within seconds of birth but advocates of delayed clamping say the baby can benefit from a little extra blood flow at this critical moment in time. ... read more »

Preterm-Born Mothers More Prone to Preterm Babies

A study revealed that mothers who were born prematurely are at increased risk of having at least one child born prematurely, too. ... read more »

'Widespread Misperceptions' of Miscarriage Revealed in Study

One in every four pregnancies ends in miscarriage but most people consider the event uncommon and most don’t know what causes it to happen, according to a recent study. ... read more »

Miracle Twins Born 24 Days Apart Expected to Go Home Soon

The Antune twins are Boston twins born 24 days apart. ... read more »

Preemies with RSV Face More Hospital Time in First 6 Months

In some children, an RSV infection can be quite serious. These kids are much more likely to spend time in a hospital due to RSV during the first six months of their lives than most kids. ... read more »

One-Third Pregnant Americans Deficient in Iodine

The American Academy of Pediatrics recently issued a policy statement that indicates one-third of all pregnant and breastfeeding women in the United States aren’t getting enough of iodine. ... read more »

Vitamin C Eases Lung Damage in Newborns of Smoking Mothers

A new study says vitamin C can help reduce newborn lung damage if their mothers were smokers during pregnancy. ... read more »

Creative, Emotional Right Brain Perks Up During Pregnancy

A team of researchers in England wanted to know more about the baby brain phenomenon, the term often used to describe the emotionally charged thought processes women experience during pregnancy. ... read more »

Preventing Gestational Diabetes From Becoming Type 2

Women diagnosed with GDM are at great risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the years after pregnancy. ... read more »

Baby’s Brain Injury May Have Occurred Long Before Delivery

Recent advances in medical science indicate many brain injuries occur during pregnancy, long before labor begins. In these cases, medical personnel are not at fault. ... read more »

Doctors Not Always in the “Pink” with Newborn Apgar Scores

One measure on the Apgar test is raising concerns. Some doctors are so concerned they're calling for a reassessment of the criteria used for newborn evaluation. ... read more »

Delivery-Room Heart Attacks Underreported

An exhaustive study of heart attacks that occur in the delivery room was conducted. According to the team's findings, these "high-stakes events" go under-reported in the United States. ... read more »

Lung Ultrasound for Detecting Pulmonary Edema

Preeclampsia, characterized by high blood pressure and high levels of protein in the urine, is usually diagnosed after week 32 but, in some cases, symptoms appear as early as week 20. ... read more »

Vitamin D Supplementation May Lower Autism Risk

People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have less of the hormones attributed to social behavior: oxytocin, serotonin, and vasopressin. But vitamin D can stimulate the production of these hormones. ... read more »

New Down Syndrome DNA Test 10 Times More Accurate

The latest edition of the Journal of Medicine includes the story on a DNA test that is ten times more accurate than those in wide use today and it can be done much earlier in the pregnancy, too. ... read more »

Bacterial Infection During Pregnancy Increases Autism Risk

Pregnant women who experience a bacterial infection while in a hospital may be at higher risk for having a child with autism, according to a new study. ... read more »

Study: Epidurals Slow Second Stage of Labor, Delay Delivery

The findings of a recent study on the use of epidurals during labor suggest the need to review current guidelines defining normal progression and potentially dangerous prolonged (abnormal) labor. ... read more »

IVF Produces Very Low Risk of Pregnancy Complications

The Australian study compared birth outcomes of babies born of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and spontaneous conception (without medical intervention). ... read more »

Three Studies Say Multivitamins Do Not Provide Benefits

A large number of Americans take multivitamins in hopes of improving their health but three new studies, all released in the Annals of Internal Medicine on the same day, suggest these dietary supplements may not be helpful. ... read more »

Itchy Tummy May Be Pregnancy-Related Liver Disease

An itchy tummy is a common complaint among pregnant women. It's usually attributed to the skin being stretched tight across an expanding belly or increased blood flow to the abdomen. Sometimes, though, it can signify a liver disease associated with pregnancy ... read more »

The Ideal Age to Have Children

What's the ideal age to start having children? IS there an ideal age? The inquiring minds at Gallup posed the question by telephone survey this past August to 5,100 people representing the full spectrum of American society. ... read more »

Are Mom’s Immunosuppressant Drugs Safe for the Baby?

A recently published paper from medical researchers at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, indicates there is no significant risk associated with some of the most commonly prescribed immunosuppressants and adverse outcomes on fetal development. ... read more »

Preterm Birth Rate at Record Low

The March of Dimes issues an annual 'report card' to each state and to the US as a nation. The report cards reveal which well-baby strategies areworking and where improvement is needed. ... read more »

Do Snoring Moms Have Smaller Babies?

Snoring is a symptom of obstructive sleep apnea, a breathing problem that occurs during sleep and causes lowered levels of oxygen in the blood. This lowering of blood oxygen levels can affect the health of a developing baby. ... read more »

Revised Sterilization Policy Could Reduce Unintended Pregnancy and Save Millions Annually

A revision in Medicaid policy could soon decreased the number of unintended pregnancies and save $215 million each year in public health costs, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. ... read more »

Weight Gain in Early Pregnancy May Affect Offspring Risk of Obesity

According to research completed by Margie Davenport and associates at the University of Alberta warns there may be a connection between excessive weight gain in early pregnancy and offspring obesity. ... read more »

Hospitals Effectively Reducing Elective C-Sections

In recent years C-section rates have increased significantly. Many of the C-sections performed are elective and some are performed during the 37th and 38th week of gestation. ... read more »

Miscarriage Risk Increases with Sustained Stress

Multiple research studies have investigated the impact of short-term, intense stress on pregnancy, but little is known about the effect of prolonged stress like that felt by women affected by the stresses of military or political life. ... read more »

Intracranial KCI Injection for Multifetal Pregnancy Reduction

Researchers from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Peking University published a study in the journal Fetal Diagnosis and Therapy regarding the effectiveness of intracranial KCI injection as an alternative to intrathoracic KCI injection. ... read more »

Valproate Linked to Increased Risk of Autism

Valproate is currently prescribed to women in child-bearing yearsfor the treatment of neuropsychological disorders and epilepsy, butaccording to a study published in JAMA's April 24th issue, Valproate may be linked to increased risk of autism. ... read more »

Researchers Suggest Paying Pregnant Women to Stay Drug Free

In a world so frequently centered on monetary gain it seems drug addiction is no different. A study was conducted using pregnant women addicted to cocaine and/or heroine in order to test this theory. ... read more »

Hearing Loss Linked to HIV Positive Pregnancy

Children born to HIV-positive mothers are more likely to have hearing problems than children born to HIV-negative mothers, according to a new study. The hearing loss is typically reported by the age of 16, but some reports occur as early as age 7. ... read more »

Starvation During Pregnancy Linked to Cardiac Side Effects

During World War II, Leningrad was seized by opposing forces in the war. Residents faced extreme starvation, including pregnant women, infants and children. Researchers studied the effects of extreme starvation in pregnancy and early childhood using this time frame. ... read more »

Lupus Does Not Affect Pregnancy Outcome in Most Cases

Lupus was once thought to affect pregnancy outcomes, but new research suggests that women with lupus can conceive and give birth to healthy, full term infants just like women who do not suffer from the condition. ... read more »

Age and BMI Help Determine Risk of Gestational Diabetes

In a huge study published in BJOG, researchers report that BMI and age during pregnancy may be a huge factor in determining the risk of gestational diabetes. Women of south Asian and African-American ethnicity were particularly at risk. ... read more »

Fetus Predetermined to Suffer Obesity or Heart Disease

Researchers at the Warwick Medical School have revealed a connection between life in the womb and obesity after birth. Healthier eating habits and regular vitamin intake may help reduce the risk of obesity late in life, according to the study. ... read more »

How Maternal Obesity Impacts Fetal Survival

A new study shows that babies born to obese mothers have a greater risk of dying up to one year after birth when compared to women of normal Body Mass Index. ... read more »

May 2009: New Guidelines for Weight Gain in Pregnancy

The Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council released a report recommending new guidelines for weight gain during pregnancy. The report updates previous guidelines. ... read more »

Effective Asthma Control Benefits Mother and Baby

Asthmatic mothers-to-be everywhere can breathe easier knowing the medications they relied upon before becoming pregnant are the best course of treatment during pregnancy, too. ... read more »

Breastfeeding and Racial/Ethnic Differences

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, breastfeeding numbers remain higher in minority populations, while significant increases in breastfeeding rates at six months and 12 months are positive. ... read more »

Diabetes Risk for African-American Women With Gestational Diabetes

Researchers have found a link between gestational diabetes and increased risk of type 2 diabetes in African-American women. ... read more »

Preventing Thyroid Disease During Pregnancy

Clinical researchers have shown that hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and subclinical thyroid disorders have dangerous effects on pregnant women and the cerebral development of the fetus.   ... read more »

Maternal-Fetal Attachment During Early Pregnancy

Connection between the pregnant woman and the fetus is important to mental and physical health during pregnancy. Researchers from the Chung Shan Medical University in Taiwan recently published a study on the topic in the Journal of Advanced Nursing. ... read more »

Flu Vaccine Gives Pregnant Women Surprising Benefit

The flu is associated with fever, nausea, and vomiting. Recent studies have linked fever with increased risk of autism, so preventing flu infection is extremely important during pregnancy. ... read more »

Birth Rates at Their Lowest in 32 Years

The CDC statistics show that birth rates declined for nearly all age groups of women under 35, but rose for women in their late 30s and early 40s. ... read more »

Herpes During Pregnancy

Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections, occurring in one in five women in the United States. ... read more »

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