Women's Health News and Studies

Does Eating Your Placenta Have Any Real Health Benefit?

Very few scientific studies have explored any benefits or risks. We’re left with the “perceived benefits,” according to Dr. Crystal Clark, who has reason to question if placentophagy is all that. ... read more »

Skipped Meals Cause Big Bellies

Modern food science is increasingly finding that when we eat is as important as what and how much we eat and the findings often defy what seems to be common sense. One such example is skipping meals. ... read more »

Oil and Gas Fracking Likely Threat to Human Reproduction

Scientists recently published the findings of a study of fracking’s effect on humans, along with the conclusion that oil and gas fracking is likely to endanger human reproduction. ... read more »

Should Pediatricians See Unvaccinated Kids?

The measles outbreak has left pediatricians facing a dilemma: should they see unvaccinated kids or turn them away so contagious diseases don't infect other patients too young to be fully vaccinated? ... read more »

Medications May Be Lethal to Small Children

We don't know how many commonly used prescription and over-the-counter drugs in use today are safe during pregnancy, nursing, and childhood but we do know many are lethal to small children. ... read more »

Eat Spicy, Live Long

Functional foods taste great but they come with added benefits. Many of the world’s spiciest cuisines are vibrant with functional foods like garlic, chili peppers and powders, cinnamon, and turmeric. ... read more »

Vaccines for Childhood Rotavirus-Related Seizures

Rotavirus infection, the most common cause of diarrhea in infants and young children, can also cause seizures in some children. One Canadian study suggests 7 percent of children hospitalized with rotavirus had experienced seizures. ... read more »

Certain Flu Vaccine Protects Kids Against Childhood Leukemia

There’s even evidence that the Hib vaccine reduces a child’s risk of developing acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the form of cancer most commonly diagnosed in children. ... read more »

Wrong Foods and Time On The Menu Lead To Obesity and Diabetes

A recent study indicates eating big meals at night, especially when they’re meals big in unhealthy foods, throws off the body clock. ... read more »

Weight-Loss Surgery Improves Health of Gut for 10+ Years

One result of a study on weight-loss surgery indicates the surgery causes healthful changes in the microbes that live in the digestive tract and these changes are evident as long as ten years later. ... read more »

Successful Vaginal Reconstruction Surgery for Scleroderma Patient

Doctors recently announced the successful outcome of a rare vaginal reconstruction surgery on a female scleroderma patient who suffered severe complications of the condition. ... read more »

Longterm Use of Oral Contraceptives May Cause Glaucoma

Women who take contraceptives for a long time may be at greater risk for eye problems, according to new research results presented at the 17th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology in New Orleans. ... read more »

Antibacterial Products May Promote Nasal Staph Infections

Triclosan is a synthetic compound used in many personal care products labeled as antibacterial. It is considered safe to use, however, recent studies suggest otherwise. ... read more »

Why Do Cancer Treatments Differ from Person to Person?

Researchers from Australia seem to be one step closer to solving the mystery of why cancer treatments work in one patient but not another. ... read more »

Toxic Chemicals Found in Childcare Centers

Some of these flame-retardant chemicals added to furniture cause neurodevelopmental delays and others are hormone disruptors. ... read more »

Timing of Maternal Tdap Immunization Is Vital to Infant

It is assumed that mothers immunized for pertussis (Tdap) pass enough antibodies on to the infant to protect against infection until infant Tdap immunizations begin, if antibodies are not passed in sufficient amounts the infant is not protected until vaccination begins. ... read more »

Hypothyroidism Risk in Newborns with Optic Nerve Hypoplasia

Researchers from the Vision Center at Children's Hospital Los Angeles pulled medical records for 135 newborns from the optic nerve hypoplasia registry. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were tested in all subjects. ... read more »

Cluster of Rare Birth Defects in Washington

There's a mystery involving rare birth defects in a small rural area of Washington state that's pitting mothers and medical personnel against the state's health department. ... read more »

Third-Hand Smoke: DNA Damage Risk for Infants and Toddlers

Third-hand smoke, the gunk that settles on floors, furniture, draperies, and even kids' toys, has the potential to damage DNA. ... read more »

Behavioral Assessment in VLBW Infants

The Infant Behavioral Assessment and Intervention Program (IBAIP) supports cognitive and physical development of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. ... read more »

Warning Signs in Children at High Risk for Bipolar Disorders

Most children of a bipolar parent will never develop the disorder but a recent study has identified early warning signs in the children most likely to develop a bipolar disorder themselves. ... read more »

SSRIs May Not Help Adults Who Had Early Life Stress

Unfortunately, SSRIs don’t work for everybody. Dr. Jeremy D. Coplan noticed SSRIs often don’t work on depression patients who had experienced early life stresses. ... read more »

Solvent Exposure Before First Pregnancy: Breast Cancer Risk

Young women exposed to organic solvents before their first full-term pregnancy are at an increased risk of developing hormone receptor-positive breast cancer if it runs in the family. ... read more »

Smoking While Pregnant: Poor Impulse Control in Child

A study provides evidence that the children of mothers who smoked while pregnant are more likely to exhibit poor impulse control and be thrill seekers as adults than are the children of non-smokers. ... read more »

Smoking Ban: Preterm Births and Asthma Hospitalizations Drop

Smoking bans are increasingly common in the last 3 decades. These bans have cleared the air and a recent study from the Netherlands indicates they've improved the health of newborns and children, too. ... read more »

Should Newborn Screening Protocols Include Genome Sequencing?

Researchers at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, question the value of including genome sequencing to the standard regimen of tests given to newborn babies. ... read more »

Should Technology Allow Parents to "Design" Their Babies?

Is modern science approaching the point where designing the baby of one's dreams becomes a reality? ... read more »

Roseroot: Natural and Effective for Depression

The results of the study found roseroot to be almost as effective in treating mild to moderate major depressive disorder (MDD) but with far fewer adverse side effects that turn patients away. ... read more »

After Delivery: Risk of Clots, Stroke, Heart Attack

All women are at higher risk of stroke than men and that risk is especially high during and months after pregnancy. ... read more »

Ring Finger Length and Future Health Problems

For ages, the length of the ring finger has been the topic of medical attention, but ring finger length is mentioned in history far before modern medicine. Culturally, men with longer ring fingers were considered more fertile and thus more sought after as life-long mates. ... read more »

Link Between Childhood Leukemia and a Genetic Mutation

A recent study of the genomes of children with a rare form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) found that this particular genetic mutation increases a child's risk of cancer by 2,700 times. ... read more »

Researchers Devise an Effective Autism Screening Tool

The sooner autism is diagnosed, the sooner treatment and coping strategies can begin. The sooner these therapies begin, the better the chance the child will thrive throughout life. A new study has found a way to assess a child's risk much sooner. Seems it's all about the tilt and size of the head. ... read more »

PreNexa Prenatal Vitamins Added More DHA and Vitamin D

A pharmaceutical company, Upsher-Smith Laboratories, Inc., announced its introduction of a new formula for its prescription prenatal vitamins marketed under the registered trademark name PreNexa. ... read more »

Pregnancy Hormones Ease Chronic Pain

During pregnancy, childbirth, and thereafter, many women don't experience pain to the degree expected. Many who use opiates for pain management find they don't need as much of it during this time. ... read more »

Phosphates and Soda Linked to Hypertension

A diet high in phosphates causes the production of FGF23 to go into overdrive, producing more than the kidneys can handle; cardiovascular disease can soon follow. ... read more »

Link Between PCOS and Psychiatric Problems

Between 6 million and 17 million women in the United States between the ages of 18 to 44 are estimated to be affected by polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). ... read more »

Parents Pushing for Autism Coverage from Obamacare

Enactment of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) leaves coverage of autism and many other medical issues up to state exchanges to establish the details of coverage if any. ... read more »

Oxytocin May Help Children with Autism

A single dose of oxytocin enhances brain activity while children with autism engage in social information, according to results of a recent study performed by researchers from Yale University. ... read more »

OTC Pain-Relievers Show Promise Preventing Recurrent UTIs

As many as 40% of women who experience a UTI will have recurrent episodes. A recent study suggests prevention of recurrent UTIs could soon be just a store shelf away. ... read more »

Researchers Want OTC Decongestant Off the Market

Phenylephrine has not been adequately tested as a decongestant until recently, prompting a team of research scientists to declare it so ineffective they urge the FDA to remove it from the market. ... read more »

Educational Support for Children of Resolved Autism

A new study reveals some cognitive and social symptoms of autism may linger and require on-going educational support for best long-term outcomes. ... read more »

Hormones and Endometrial Cancer in Postmenopausal Women

Past studies have proven a direct relationship between obesity and increased risk of endometrial cancer. Researchers from National Cancer Institute and National Institutes of Health recently published the results of the study in the journal Endocrine-Related Cancer. ... read more »

Newborn Care Practices and Health Seeking Behavior

Although the details of the research are limited, a new study out of Gujarat, India shows a direct connection between socioeconomic status and medical care sought and received by pregnant women and newborns. ... read more »

New Type 1 Diabetes Genetic Discovered to Be “Game Changer”

Approximately 3 million people in the US have T1D. It develops during infancy or childhood and, since there is no cure at this time, the disease remains with the patient for the rest of his life. ... read more »

Why Chromosomal Birth Defects More Likely in Older Mothers

A team of research scientists has recently discovered a new clue in the mystery of why chromosomal birth defects, like those that cause Down syndrome, are more likely to occur in older mothers. ... read more »

Cognitive Development after Neonatal Intestinal Obstruction Treatment

Neonates born with intestinal obstructions are treated surgically in infancy. There are no studies revealing the long-term motor and cognitive development of these children during childhood years. ... read more »

More Bugs in Antibiotic-Laced Conventional Burger Meat Than Organic

A new study from Consumer Reports may suggest some rethinking about your beloved burger is in order. Industrial-scale beef producers include antibiotics as a daily part of their livestock’s diet. ... read more »

Mindfulness Therapy Equally Effective as Prescription Antidepressants

Prescription antidepressants are the traditional line of treatment for overcoming a depressive episode and staving off relapses but they come with side effects that many people cannot tolerate. ... read more »

Early Breast Cancer Detection Test for African-American Women

Young African-American women are more likely to develop triple-negative strains of breast cancer. These strains have a high mortality rate with most patients living less than five years. ... read more »

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