Women's Health News and Studies

Successful Vaginal Reconstruction Surgery, Scleroderma Patient

Doctors recently announced the successful outcome of a rare vaginal reconstruction surgery on a female scleroderma patient who suffered severe complications of the condition. ... read more »

University Students Altered Birth Control Use to Avoid Menstruation

Hormonal birth control pills can be used to delay or eliminate some menstrual periods, especially for women who experience heavy bleeding or prolonged menstrual periods, but according to researchers, university students are altering birth control schedules. ... read more »

Health Effects: Teens and Increased Screen Time

A recent survey of teen activities indicates Australian teenagers are trading the recommended one hour per day of physical activity for more screen time and it could be jeopardizing their health. ... read more »

Privately Insured Americans: Diabetes Rise

Approximately 8.8 percent of insured Americans had diabetes or had a doctor tell them they were at risk for the disease in 2012 according to a new report by HCCI, the Health Care Cost Institute. This rate is up from 8.3 percent the previous year. ... read more »

Shared Sleeping Infant Deaths: Texas Polar Vortex

The chilling antics of the polar vortex left Central Texas temperatures far below normal this winter. Texans bundled up to stay warm and cozy during a winter so cold it broke records. ... read more »

Personal Care Products Pose Risk to Babies

Shampoos, lotions, and other baby care products expose babies and toddlers to potentially harmful substances at a great rate, according to a new study. ... read more »

Possible Treatment Breakthrough: Fragile X Syndrome

Previous medical research has pinpointed the part of the cell affected by FXS but a new study reveals how the problem occurs. ... read more »

New Catheterization Procedure for Babies with Hole in Heart

Approximately 9 of every 1,000 people are born with some form of heart defect, the most common of which are septal defects. ... read more »

Intracranial Germ Cell Tumor: Quality of Life

The chances of a pediatric patient surviving an intracranial germ cell tumor are high, leading researchers from Taiwan to question the effect of long-term survival on neuropsychological function and overall quality of life. ... read more »

Neonatal Intestinal Obstruction Treatment Effects

Neonates born with intestinal obstructions are treated surgically in infancy. There are no studies revealing the long-term motor and cognitive development of these children during childhood years. ... read more »

Is Antibiotic-Laced Burger Meat Unhealthy?

A new study from Consumer Reports may suggest some rethinking about your beloved burger is in order. Industrial-scale beef producers include antibiotics as a daily part of their livestock’s diet. ... read more »

Mindfulness Therapy Instead of Antidepressants

Prescription antidepressants are the traditional line of treatment for overcoming a depressive episode and staving off relapses but they come with side effects that many people cannot tolerate. ... read more »

National Eating Disorder Awareness Week: Get Screened

The goal of National Eating Disorder Awareness Week is to spread the word about screening tests that can identify dangerous eating behaviors and let people know where to find help. ... read more »

Non-Surgical Treatment for Clubfoot

Mary Snyder made it a point to become as well educated as possible about clubfoot, a birth defect that causes feet to turn inward into a U-shape. ... read more »

Intelligence Link to Time Spent Breastfeeding

Researchers from Boston Children's Hospital believe cognitive development, or intelligence, may be associated with the length of time an infant spends breastfeeding. ... read more »

Human Breast Milk: Cure for Antibiotic Resistance?

Antibiotic resistance is only increasing, but researchers believe they have found the key to bringing antibiotic-resistant strains back under control. ... read more »

Minnesota Bans Hormone Disruptor Triclosan

Minnesota is the first state to ban all products containing triclosan, an antibacterial agent found in many household products and known to disrupt hormones in humans and harm the environment. ... read more »

Dangers of High Fructose Corn Syrup

A team of doctors at the Mayo Clinic has published a statement on the dangers of HFCS consumption and called for restricting its consumption to an absolute minimum. ... read more »

Study: Nurses and Testicular Cancer Patients

Nurses are caregivers who provide support and information to patients in a clinical setting. In oncology, support may take on a sensitive note, especially with patients fighting testicular cancer. ... read more »

Child Abuse and Autism Risk

A study published in JAMA Psychiatry reports a connection between child abuse and future risk of having children with autism. ... read more »

Avoid Food Allergies: 17 Weeks of Breast Milk

Seventeen seems to be the magic number to best protect a baby against the development of food allergies. A recent British study found that babies who are fed only breast milk until at least 17 weeks old are less likely to develop food allergies by age 2. ... read more »

Experts Clarify Details Regarding PCOS Diagnosis

Scientists have now issued guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). There had been much debate in the medical community over various aspects of the condition. ... read more »

Vaccinations Eradicate Rubella in Western Hemisphere

The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) seized the moment to announce the complete eradication of rubella in the Western Hemisphere. ... read more »

Spending Time with Mother Nature Strengthens Immune System

Spending time in nature strengthens the immune system, according to Ming Kuo. ... read more »

Skipped Meals Cause Big Bellies

Modern food science is increasingly finding that when we eat is as important as what and how much we eat and the findings often defy what seems to be common sense. One such example is skipping meals. ... read more »

Sex Education: Young People Not Getting What They Want

Two recently published studies concerning sex education indicate young people are just not getting what they want. They’d really rather be getting the straight story. ... read more »

Replace One Sweet Beverage Daily, Reduce Diabetes Risk

The findings of a study of dietary impact indicate how important it is for people who regularly consume sweet beverages to replace just one serving a day to reduce the risk for type 2 diabetes. ... read more »

Oil and Gas Fracking Likely Threat to Human Reproduction

Scientists recently published the findings of a study of fracking’s effect on humans, along with the conclusion that oil and gas fracking is likely to endanger human reproduction. ... read more »

Menstruation Starts Early in Girls Who Drink Sugary Sweets

New research indicates that what a girl drinks before her first period can hasten the arrival of her first period. It can influence her risk of developing breast cancer later in life, too. ... read more »

International Study Recommends Ovary Removal by Age 35

For women who carry the BRCA1 gene mutation, the odds of getting ovarian cancer are 39 for every 100 BRCA+ women. Once disease develops, preventive ovary removal surgery by age 35 is the best defense. ... read more »

High-Fiber Diet Reduces Diabetes Risk

Diabetes can often be avoided, delayed, or reversed by consuming a diet high in fiber. ... read more »

Early Infant Growth and Asthma Risk

According to researchers in the Netherlands, fast infant growth during the first three months after birth may cause an increased risk of asthma. Fetal growth did not appear to have an effect on asthma risk. ... read more »

Erectile Dysfunction Drug May Help Men Lose Weight

Sildenafil is promoted as a drug for the treatment of erectile dysfunction, but that is not the only benefit users gain. According to a research study, the ED drug helps change white fat to brown fat, increasing the likelihood of weight loss. ... read more »

Eat Spicy, Live Long

Functional foods taste great but they come with added benefits. Many of the world’s spiciest cuisines are vibrant with functional foods like garlic, chili peppers and powders, cinnamon, and turmeric. ... read more »

Children are Less Physically Fit than their Parents

Children are about 15 percent less aerobically fit than their parents were at the same age, according to a new study presented by the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2013 in Dallas, Texas. ... read more »

Brain Protein May Explain Sensory Overload in Autism

Recent research on a protein known as having to offer insights into how the brain develops structurally and how the protein’s absence could lead to an autistic child’s feelings of too much stimulation. ... read more »

Baby Wipes May Be Cause of Persistent Rash

Moms everywhere have come to rely on products like baby wipes for infants and wet wipes for older children as an easy, convenient way to add an extra layer of cleanliness to a messy situation. ... read more »

Autistic Children Sometimes Bond More Closely with Family Dog

Gretchen Carlise is a doctoral candidate the Center for Human-Animal Interaction. Her dissertation explores the many ways a family dog can enhance the lives of autistic children. ... read more »

ACA Out-of-Pocket Healthcare Cap Changes in 2016

The cap (limit) on out-of-pocket healthcare expenses that individuals and families must pay, changes in 2016; this will lower the cost to families that run up big medical bills. ... read more »

United States Updates HIV Screening Recommendations

A recent publication in the Annals of Internal Medicine reports a change has been made to screening recommendations that include recommendations for screening during pregnancy. ... read more »

Sweet Beverages — Not Foods — Linked to Endometrial Cancer

Several factors are thought to contribute to the development of endometrial cancer, but a new study reveals a potent new culprit: sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). ... read more »

Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Brain Tumors

Researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital across various hospital departments recently published the results of an 11-year study on the treatment of pediatric brain tumors with proton radiotherapy (PRT). ... read more »

New Childhood Respiratory Virus Revealed

Researchers from Vanderbilt University have discovered a new respiratory virus now thought to be the second leading cause of bronchiolitis in children. The virus is known as human metapneumovirus or MPV for short. ... read more »

Melatonin Not Safe for Children’s Sleep Problems

An Australian physiologist who’s studied melatonin for 40 years, however, has recently issued a call for caution, especially when it’s given for children’s sleep problems. ... read more »

Harness Power of the Menstrual Cycle to Stop Smoking

Researchers found the urge to smoke is strongest during specific times of the cycle and suggest new interventions could harness the power of the menstrual cycle, making it easier for women to quit. ... read more »

Effect of Solar UV Radiation on Childhood Cancer Rates

Previous studies have reported a connection between UV exposure during pregnancy and lowered the risk of some forms of cancer in children. Additional studies have mirrored the results but in cases of adult cancers. ... read more »

Combination Therapy Protects Infants From Two Malaria Strains

In some developing nations, malaria is a constant threat to infant and child health. There are multiple strains of malaria, but for the first time, doctors are able to treat two of the most common strains simultaneously with combination therapy. ... read more »

Coffee + Tamoxifen Cuts Breast Cancer Recurrence Rate by Half

A recent study indicates women taking tamoxifen who also drink a small to moderate amount of coffee every day cut their risk of breast cancer recurrence by approximately half. ... read more »

Coffee Night Caps Wreck the Whole Day. Sorry.

Coffee night caps wreck the whole day and a caffeine buzz alone is not to blame. Caffeine interferes with the body’s natural circadian rhythms, the body’s internal clock. ... read more »

Breastfeeding Stimulates Gut Flora

Infants begin developing their gastrointestinal microbiomes at birth by way of their mother's milk during breastfeeding. Their bodies take over production of microbiota once breastfeeding ends. ... read more »

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