Women's Health News and Studies

SSRIs May Not Help Adults Who Had Early Life Stress

Unfortunately, SSRIs don’t work for everybody. Dr. Jeremy D. Coplan noticed SSRIs often don’t work on depression patients who had experienced early life stresses. ... read more »

Obese Women Less Likely to Develop Endometriosis

Medical research has associated obesity with a long list of potential health problems and diseases. Among them is high-risk of pregnancy and delivery complications. ... read more »

Experience of Acupuncture Eases Cancer Drugs’ Side Effects

The results of a recent clinical trial may offer the hope of relief from the distresses of cancer drugs by the experience of acupuncture. ... read more »

Low-Fat Yogurt May Cause Asthma and Hay Fever

Researchers have found a connection between eating low-fat yogurt during pregnancy and an increased risk of hay fever and/or asthma in their children. ... read more »

The Problem of Abstinence

One of the most pressing issues facing youth today is the constant debate regarding sex education. ... read more »

Radiation Exposure May Affect Testicular Cancer Rates

According to a new preliminary study by the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, male infants born to mothers exposed to radiation in early pregnancy may suffer from increased risk of testicular cancer later in life. ... read more »

Autism Symptoms Affected by Birth Timing

Researchers at Michigan State University has revealed a connection between pre-term and post-term delivery and certain autism symptoms. ... read more »

Hazelnut Oil: A New Source for Healthy Formula Fats

A mother's breast milk is perfect in every way and can provide all the nutrition her baby needs for more than a year. When a new mother cannot or chooses not to breastfeed, infant formula is the alternative. ... read more »

Risk Factors Revealed for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

According to the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, there are several factors that may increase the risk of having children with a genetic predisposition to the cancer. ... read more »

The Link Between Oral Contraceptives and Prostate Cancer

Researchers have published their findings in BMJ Open linking prostate cancer with the use of oral contraceptives, such as birth control pills. ... read more »

Psychosocial Correlates of Exclusive Breastfeeding

The World Health Organization (WHO) suggests at least six months of breastfeeding to ensure optimal health and well-being for every infant, though a small percentage of mothers breastfeed for this length of time. ... read more »

HPV Vaccinations: Fear and Misinformation

HPV is one of the causes of cervical cancer. Gardasil offers preventative protection against HPV infection, but not all high-risk young women understand the benefits of the vaccination. ... read more »

Granulosa Cell Tumors of the Ovary: Review of 43 Cases

Granulosa cell tumors are rare tumors that can develop on the ovaries. There are two types of the disease - juvenile and adult. ... read more »

Emphatic Skills Improve Patient/Physician Relationship

Emphatic skills, including socialization, empathy and communication style are important to creating that initial bond of trust between patient and physician in all medical settings. ... read more »

Critical Period of Infant Development and Obesity

Researchers at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill recently published a study in the journal Social Science & Medicine. The study aimed to find a possible link between early infant feeding practices and increased risk of childhood and adult obesity. ... read more »

Bacteria Profile of Breast Milk Revealed

Previous studies have proven healthy bacteria present in breast milk may be a contributing factor in the development of the infant gastrointestinal system. ... read more »

Common Orthopedic Problems in Newborns

Orthopedic problems in newborns are common with flat feet, in-toeing and bowlegs being common in the United States, but not all populations exhibit the same newborn orthopedic problems. ... read more »

Sensorineural Hearing Loss After Passing Newborn Screen

A new study recently published in the JAMA Network journal Otolarynology ' Head and Neck Surgery, brings to light the inconsistencies betweennewborn screening results and childhood hearing. ... read more »

Flu Outbreak Reaches Epidemic Proportions in US, CDC Says

The word epidemic is not used lightly by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), but that is exactly the word being used to describe flu season 2012-2013. ... read more »

Respiratory Exacerbations in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic fibrosis is a progressive, degenerative disease present at birth. The disease progresses with age and can cause premature death due to complications. ... read more »

Whole Body Skin Cleansing with Chlorhexidine in Neonates

In medical centers with low-resource reserves, cleansing the umbilical cord with chlorhexidine is used to reduce mortality rates. ... read more »

Predicting Borderline Ovarian Tumor Relapse

BOTs (Borderline Ovarian Tumors) carry a higher risk of relapse ' up to30%. Factors associated with relapse have not been accurately identified leaving doctors with incomplete prognostic information prior tosurgery. ... read more »

Mitochondrial Diseases in Children a Thing of the Past?

Researchers from the NYSCF (New York Stem Cell Foundation) partnered with CUMC (Columbia Medical Center) to create a special technique to stop mitochondrial diseases from genetically passing on to children. The technique is in the earliest clinical stages. ... read more »

How Do Parents Feel About an HPV Vaccine for Boys?

HPV (human papilloma virus) is passed during intercourse or other sexual contact, including oral sex. Girls can choose to be vaccinated against some strains of HPV that cause cervical cancer, but girls are not the only ones at risk. ... read more »

HIV, Sexual Violence and Special Populations

According to researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in adolescent and pregnant populations, the immune system may be altered, but the alteration increases the risk of HIV infection. ... read more »

Obese Dads Pass Poor Immunity to Children

Duke University is behind a new study published in the BMC Medicine journal. According to the study, paternal obesity may increase the risk of disease, including cancer, to offspring. ... read more »

OraQuick In-Home HIV Test

The OraQuick In-Home HIV Test is designed to give users privacy, accuracy and a preliminary test result for HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies. ... read more »

Early Sexual Activity and Early Substance Use

Experts know, based on previous research and data collection, that conduct problems are predictive of an earlier sexually active start, higher risk of pregnancy and higher risk of contracting an STD, including HIV. ... read more »

Slow Growth in Infancy Disappears by Teen Years

Slow growth in infancy can be difficult for some parents to deal with or understand, but researchers from the University of Bristol claim growth rates tend to reach near normal by teen years. ... read more »

High-Risk Teens and the Papanicolaou Test

Current standards suggest testing for cervical cancer starting at age 21, but researchers believe there could be an unrealized need for testing earlier in high-risk teen populations. ... read more »

Violence Against Women May Include Contraceptive Sabotage

Contraceptive sabotage is more common than many women may recognize, leading ACOG to establish guidelines and support materials for obstetricians to educate patients who may be experiencing violence at home. ... read more »

Vaccine for Cytomegalovirus (CMV) on the Horizon

The cytomegalovirus (CMV) may not be a virus most people have heard of, but it is one of the leading causes of birth defects in the world. About one in 750 infants are born with a birth defect contributed to CMV. ... read more »

Parenteral Therapy Resistance and Tubo-Ovarian Abscess (TOA)

Parenteral therapy bypasses the gastrointestinal system and hits the circulatory system directly. Researchers from the Yokohama City University Medical Center have attempted to find risk factors that could predict therapy resistance in tubo-ovarian abscess (TOA). ... read more »

Prevalence of Vaginal Candidiasis in Young Women

Nigerian researchers recently published a study on vaginal candidiasis in The Nigerian Postgraduate Medical Journal showing a high rate of vaginal candidiasis in women with vaginal infections. ... read more »

Safety of Indomethacin IUD: Random Control Study

Researchers from the China-Japan Friendship Hospital report indomethacin IUD are effective and carry a low risk of complications, including expulsion, bleeding and pain. ... read more »

Are BRCA 1/2 Mutations Associated with Early Onset Menopause?

Researchers from the Department of Obstetrics at UC San Francisco recently published a study testing a possible connection between BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations and early onset menopause. ... read more »

Erection Problems Early Sign for Heart Disease or Death

A new Australian study published in PLoS Medicine claims even the slightest case of erectile dysfunction could be caused by an underlying heart condition that could increase risk of early death. ... read more »

Sexual Risk Behaviors Amongst Cocaine and Heroin Users

Based on the results of a study, published in the journal Addiction Science and Clinical Practice, condom use shows a lack of intimacy and trust and HIV status is determined based on appearance rather than negative HIV testing. ... read more »

The Womb: Battleground in Texas

The womb is the battleground in Texas these days, in a fight for healthcare rights that centers around the closing of 37 of the state's 42 Planned Parenthood-sponsored medical facilities. ... read more »

Cause of Pain in Women with Endometriosis

Researchers know little about how pelvis pain is caused in women with endometriosis. In a recent study published in the Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, researchers suggest neural growth factors may play a part in the development of endometrial pain. ... read more »

Gel Application to Reduce Pain During PAP Smear

Insertion of the speculum during a PAP smear examination can be painful for some women. The fear of this pain may be enough to keep women from scheduling an annual examination. ... read more »

Role of Socioeconomic Status on Maternal Depression

Quality of life, for pregnant women and new mothers, can be affected by depression. Research also points to negative side effects on newborn growth and development when depression is an issue for new mothers. ... read more »

8 Public Places to Avoid During Cold and Flu Season

The best way to treat a cold or the flu is not to get them in the first place. Prevention means knowing where these nasty germs are hiding and avoiding them like the plague. ... read more »

New Warnings About Bed Sharing with Infants

The number of babies who share a parents' bed has more than doubledsince the early 1990s, according to the recent National Infant SleepStudy, despite a number of public service ads warning of the increasedrisk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). ... read more »

A Bone Hormone May Influence Brain Development and Cognition

Researchers discovered that the skeleton exerts a powerful influence on brain development and cognitive function in unborn mice. Findings in mice studies could eventually lead to new approaches to the prevention and treatment of certain neurological disorders in humans. ... read more »

Newborns May Get Sick So Beneficial Microbes Can Flourish

Within the first few months of a baby's life, many parents come to the realization that their new little bundle of joy is sometimes more bundle, less joy. This realization often occurs during long sleepless nights while trying to soothe a fussy or sick baby. ... read more »

Abdominopelvic Tuberculosis Mimics AOC and PID

Doctors and researchers in the Jiangsu Province in China note 28 cases of Abdominopelvic Tuberculosis (TB) commonly misdiagnosed as advanced ovarian cancer (AOC) or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). ... read more »

Apnea in Children Hospitalized With Bronchiolitis

Researchers from the Department of Pediatrics at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center in California recently published a study that aimed to find common characteristics that increased the risk of apnea in children admitted to the hospital with bronchiolitis. ... read more »

Promiscuous Moms May Produce Sexier Sons, In Mice

A promiscuous mother may produce sons that are more appealing to female mice, according to a new study. Female mice are attracted to pheromones present in the urine of male mice. ... read more »

IVF and the Marital Challenge

In vitro fertilization (IVF) and other forms of assisted reproduction therapies (ART) rely on substantial doses of mood-affecting hormones, which add higher peaks and deeper valleys to one's everyday emotional roller-coaster. ... read more »

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