Women's Health News and Studies

Not in the Mood? Sleep On It!

A new study indicates someone not in the mood should sleep on it for an extra hour tonight to improve libido tomorrow. ... read more »

Early Breast Cancer Detection Test for African-American Women

Young African-American women are more likely to develop triple-negative strains of breast cancer. These strains have a high mortality rate with most patients living less than five years. ... read more »

Women’s Risk of STD Infection In Sync With Menstrual Cycle

Research reveals a woman’s risk of STD infection is in sync with her menstrual cycle and it’s all about making it easier for a successful pregnancy to occur. ... read more »

Is Social Media Fueling Rise in STD Cases?

Studies indicate a rise in sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) that are thought to be driven by social media use. ... read more »

Timing of Maternal Tdap Immunization Is Vital to Infant

It is assumed that mothers immunized for pertussis (Tdap) pass enough antibodies on to the infant to protect against infection until infant Tdap immunizations begin, if antibodies are not passed in sufficient amounts the infant is not protected until vaccination begins. ... read more »

Hypothyroidism Risk in Newborns with Optic Nerve Hypoplasia

Researchers from the Vision Center at Children's Hospital Los Angeles pulled medical records for 135 newborns from the optic nerve hypoplasia registry. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were tested in all subjects. ... read more »

Psychosocial Correlates of Exclusive Breastfeeding

The World Health Organization (WHO) suggests at least six months of breastfeeding to ensure optimal health and well-being for every infant, though a small percentage of mothers breastfeed for this length of time. ... read more »

Newborn Care Practices and Health Seeking Behavior

Although the details of the research are limited, a new study out of Gujarat, India shows a direct connection between socioeconomic status and medical care sought and received by pregnant women and newborns. ... read more »

Neonatal Intestinal Obstruction Treatment Effects

Neonates born with intestinal obstructions are treated surgically in infancy. There are no studies revealing the long-term motor and cognitive development of these children during childhood years. ... read more »

Lower Sexual Interest in Postpartum Women

After giving birth, women often report having lower sexual interest. It is often accepted as just being a part of giving birth and moving from pregnant woman to new mom. The revelation could help women feel less negative about looming sexual interest. ... read more »

HPV Vaccinations: Fear and Misinformation

HPV is one of the causes of cervical cancer. Gardasil offers preventative protection against HPV infection, but not all high-risk young women understand the benefits of the vaccination. ... read more »

Granulosa Cell Tumors of the Ovary: Review of 43 Cases

Granulosa cell tumors are rare tumors that can develop on the ovaries. There are two types of the disease - juvenile and adult. ... read more »

Emphatic Skills Improve Patient/Physician Relationship

Emphatic skills, including socialization, empathy and communication style are important to creating that initial bond of trust between patient and physician in all medical settings. ... read more »

Antioxidants: Breast Milk Vs. Infant Formula

Researchers from The University of Belgrade recently compared the effects of breast milk and infant formula on smooth non-vascular muscles and antioxidant properties of both. ... read more »

Critical Period of Infant Development and Obesity

Researchers at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill recently published a study in the journal Social Science & Medicine. The study aimed to find a possible link between early infant feeding practices and increased risk of childhood and adult obesity. ... read more »

Bacteria Profile of Breast Milk Revealed

Previous studies have proven healthy bacteria present in breast milk may be a contributing factor in the development of the infant gastrointestinal system. ... read more »

Study: Nurses and Testicular Cancer Patients

Nurses are caregivers who provide support and information to patients in a clinical setting. In oncology, support may take on a sensitive note, especially with patients fighting testicular cancer. ... read more »

National Eating Disorder Awareness Week: Get Screened

The goal of National Eating Disorder Awareness Week is to spread the word about screening tests that can identify dangerous eating behaviors and let people know where to find help. ... read more »

Non-Surgical Treatment for Clubfoot

Mary Snyder made it a point to become as well educated as possible about clubfoot, a birth defect that causes feet to turn inward into a U-shape. ... read more »

Pphubbing: Cellphones Wreck Relationships, Trigger Depression

Overzealous cellphone use “can undermine the bedrock of our happiness — our relationships with our romantic partners.” The researchers have even given the phenomenon a name: pphubbing. ... read more »

New Technique Detects Depression in the Bloodstream

Researchers have discovered a marker in the bloodstream that can be measured by analyzing a simple blood sample. The marker is linked to a neural network in the brain that regulates self-reference. ... read more »

A Bone Hormone May Influence Brain Development and Cognition

Researchers discovered that the skeleton exerts a powerful influence on brain development and cognitive function in unborn mice. Findings in mice studies could eventually lead to new approaches to the prevention and treatment of certain neurological disorders in humans. ... read more »

US Kids Not Drinking Enough Water; Health Consequences Rising

A recent study from the Harvard University TH Chan School of Public Health reveals that children in the United States just aren’t drinking enough water for optimum physical and mental health. ... read more »

Summer Water Safety: Breath-Holding Contests Can Be Dangerous

Breath-holding contests seem like an innocent rite of passage but some high-profile drownings by expert swimmers in recent years have illustrated the dangers involved with holding breath too long. ... read more »

Penis Transplant Restores Organ After Botched Circumcision

A 21-year-old man in South Africa recently received a rare penis transplant and is reportedly doing fine. The unnamed patient “has made a full recovery and has regained all function..." ... read more »

New Type 1 Diabetes Genetic Discovered to Be “Game Changer”

Approximately 3 million people in the US have T1D. It develops during infancy or childhood and, since there is no cure at this time, the disease remains with the patient for the rest of his life. ... read more »

Intracranial Germ Cell Tumor: Quality of Life

The chances of a pediatric patient surviving an intracranial germ cell tumor are high, leading researchers from Taiwan to question the effect of long-term survival on neuropsychological function and overall quality of life. ... read more »

The Problem of Abstinence

One of the most pressing issues facing youth today is the constant debate regarding sex education. ... read more »

Antibacterial Products May Promote Nasal Staph Infections

Triclosan is a synthetic compound used in many personal care products labeled as antibacterial. It is considered safe to use, however, recent studies suggest otherwise. ... read more »

Skipped Meals Cause Big Bellies

Modern food science is increasingly finding that when we eat is as important as what and how much we eat and the findings often defy what seems to be common sense. One such example is skipping meals. ... read more »

Brain Processes Chronic Pain as Emotional

A study indicates the brain processes pain in different ways: short, sudden pain is processed as a physical sensation but chronic, long-term pain is processed in the brain’s emotion-processing area. ... read more »

8 Ways to Beat the Heat from an Emergency Medicine Expert

Gardeners, sports enthusiasts, and adults monitoring kids at play need to be on alert for signs of illness and take every precaution to prevent harm caused by heat stress. ... read more »

Risk Factors Revealed for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

According to the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, there are several factors that may increase the risk of having children with a genetic predisposition to the cancer. ... read more »

Gel Application to Reduce Pain During PAP Smear

Insertion of the speculum during a PAP smear examination can be painful for some women. The fear of this pain may be enough to keep women from scheduling an annual examination. ... read more »

Oil and Gas Fracking Likely Threat to Human Reproduction

Scientists recently published the findings of a study of fracking’s effect on humans, along with the conclusion that oil and gas fracking is likely to endanger human reproduction. ... read more »

Link Between PCOS and Psychiatric Problems

Between 6 million and 17 million women in the United States between the ages of 18 to 44 are estimated to be affected by polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). ... read more »

Study Finds Baby’s Stress Level Elevates When Mom’s Does

To test the emotional contagion theory, a team of researchers enlisted a group of mothers and their infants. Sure enough, the babies picked right up on their mothers' stress. ... read more »

Is Antibiotic-Laced Burger Meat Unhealthy?

A new study from Consumer Reports may suggest some rethinking about your beloved burger is in order. Industrial-scale beef producers include antibiotics as a daily part of their livestock’s diet. ... read more »

8 Public Places to Avoid During Cold and Flu Season

The best way to treat a cold or the flu is not to get them in the first place. Prevention means knowing where these nasty germs are hiding and avoiding them like the plague. ... read more »

Wine Her, Dine Her to Better Chances of Making Love

A new study indicates that food, sex, and other rewards all activate the same area of the female brain. ... read more »

Cinnamon May Help Treat PCOS

Adding cinnamon to the diet may be an effective treatment for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). ... read more »

The Flu Is Really Tough on Preemies

Research indicates the flu is really tough on preemies, many of whom are already battling other physical ailments associated with their early births. ... read more »

Ever Wonder What Skinny People Eat for Breakfast?

Do you ever wonder what skinny people eat for breakfast? You’re not alone. Researchers at the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab wondered about the same things so they asked. ... read more »

Preemies More Likely To Be Left-Handed

Children born early are almost twice as likely to be left-handed rather than right-handed, according to author Sharon Moalem, MD, PhD. Moalem explores the health implications of handedness. ... read more »

OraQuick In-Home HIV Test

The OraQuick In-Home HIV Test is designed to give users privacy, accuracy and a preliminary test result for HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies. ... read more »

Cialis May Help Men Orgasm and Ejaculate

Cialis, one of the more popular erectile dysfunction drugs, may help men achieve orgasm and ejaculation, according to a new study published in the British Journal of Urology International. ... read more »

Prepubescent Male Smokers Father Overweight Sons

The findings of a lengthy study suggest that a boy's use of cigarettes today may have a dramatic effect on the kids he'll have someday, especially his sons. ... read more »

Autism Symptoms Affected by Birth Timing

Researchers at Michigan State University has revealed a connection between pre-term and post-term delivery and certain autism symptoms. ... read more »

Heavy Kids Are Sluggish Thinkers

Excess pounds in childhood threaten the child's health well into adulthood and advanced age. One study indicates that kids who are too heavy are more sluggish thinkers than their thinner peers. ... read more »

Breastfeeding Linked to Reduced Risk of BRCA Ovarian Cancer

“Heredity is not destiny,” says Dr. Timothy R. Rebbeck. There are specific measures a woman can take that significantly reduce the odds of developing a BRCA-related cancer. ... read more »

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